McCain, McCaskill oppose more clunker funding

New money for the so-called "cash for clunkers" program easily passed the House Friday, but the proposal faces a challenge from Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP rushes to cut ties to Moore GOP strategist: 'There needs to be a repudiation' of Roy Moore by Republicans World leaders reach agreement on trade deal without United States: report MORE (R-Ariz.), who has pledged to block the measure.

McCain said he would filibuster the bill, expected to be considered by the Senate next week, that would redirect $2 billion in energy loans for auto companies into the program.

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House Democrats last week rushed to add more money to the clunker exchange program when it proved so popular the initial $1 billion Congress provided quickly ran out.

"Within a few weeks we will see that this process was abused by speculators and people who took advantage of what is basically a huge government subsidy of corporations that they already own," McCain told Fox News, which reported the former 2008 GOP presidential candidate was prepared to create roadblocks to the legislation that amount to a filibuster.

"I can't imagine that any taxpayer of America would have thought that the [Troubled Assets Relief Program], the financial recovery money, would be used now to subsidize the sale of automobiles in America," McCain added.

McCain will lead what could be a bipartisan effort to block the bill. Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillDemocratic Homeland Security members request additional DHS nominee testimony Senate panel delays vote on Trump’s Homeland Security pick Steve Israel: ‘We had a better time at the DMZ than we’re going to have tonight’ MORE (D-Mo.) used her Twitter page Friday to say she would oppose more funding.

Two of the program's initial backers in the Senate have also sent signals that there may need to be tweaks to the voucher program before an extension wins their vote.

"We believe that Congress needs this information immediately in order to evaluate the program's effectiveness in attaining its two goals of stimulating automobile sales and reducing oil consumption," Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSenators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff Bipartisan group of lawmakers aim to reform US sugar program Senate panel to hold hearing on bump stocks MORE (D-Calif.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsBipartisan group of lawmakers aim to reform US sugar program A bipartisan bridge opens between the House and Senate Gaming the odds of any GOP tax bill getting signed into law MORE (R-Maine) wrote Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. "Without strong data on the effectiveness of the program, it will be more difficult for Congress to evaluate and improve the current program."