Rockefeller's public option defeated 8-15 in Senate Finance Committee vote

Rockefeller's public option defeated 8-15 in Senate Finance Committee vote

The Senate Finance Committee rejected Sen. Jay RockefellerJay RockefellerOvernight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term Obama to preserve torture report in presidential papers MORE’s (D-W.Va.) amendment to tack a public option onto the committee’s healthcare bill.

After nearly four hours of debate, the amendment fell on an 8-15 vote, with Republicans united against it and Democrats vociferously defending the notion of providing people with a not-for-profit insurance company backed by the government.

But Democrats on the committee did not mirror the GOP’s unity. As expected, Baucus and Democratic Sens. Tom CarperTom CarperGovernors-turned-senators meet to talk healthcare Overnight Healthcare: GOP'S repeal-only plan quickly collapses in Senate Dem leaders amp up calls for bipartisan ObamaCare fixes MORE (Del.), Kent Conrad (N.D.), Blanche Lincoln (Ark.) and Bill NelsonBill NelsonGore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Honda recalls 1.2 million cars over battery fires Vulnerable senators raise big money ahead of 2018 MORE (Fla.) joined all 10 of the panel’s Republicans to vote down Rockefeller’s amendment. Notably, Baucus and Conrad, along with Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.), spent months trying to strike a deal with three committee Republicans.

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Rockefeller issued strong condemnations of the health insurance industry. “The insurance companies, in my judgment, are dedicated to protecting their profits and put their customers second. It’s a harsh statement but a true statement,” he said.

Health insurance companies are “rapacious,” Rockefeller said, pointing to industry practices such as rescinding policies or jacking up premiums when people get sick. “It’s a subject that ought to make us very angry,” he said, but “in the face of all of this, we’re giving them a half a trillion dollars in subsidies. I don’t understand that.”

Baucus said he left the public option out of the bill, and voted against Rockfeller’s amendment, because he did not believe it had enough support in the Senate to make it all the way to President Barack ObamaBarack ObamaTrump considers naming Yellen or Cohn to lead the Fed West Wing to empty out for August construction Ex-CIA chief: Trump’s Boy Scout speech felt like ‘third world authoritarian's youth rally’ MORE’s desk. “My job is to get a bill that can get 60 votes,” he said. “I can count.

“If this provision is in the bill coming out of the committee, it will jeopardize real, meaningful healthcare reform,” Baucus said. “I want a bill that can become law.”

Nevertheless, Baucus indicated that he has no objection to the proposal itself. “I see a lot to like in the public option,” he said. “The public option would help to keep the insurance companies’ feet to the fire. There’s no doubt about that.”

But Baucus defended his chairman’s mark of the bill, pointing to new insurance market reforms requiring companies to sign up anyone regardless of pre-existing conditions and limiting insurers’ ability to charge higher premiums to older and sicker people. The bill also would assess $67 billion in fees on insurers over 10 years. ”Some of your questions sort of leave the indication that the mark is easy on the insurance industry, and it’s not,” Baucus said.

“We need a public option to create competition and bring down costs,” said Sen. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerCongress can send a powerful message by passing the Israel Anti-Boycott Act OPINION | Dems' ‘new’ agenda? A recycled copy of Trump’s playbook Trump: Why aren't 'beleaguered AG,' investigators looking at Hillary Clinton? MORE (D-N.Y.), who will bring up a separate public option amendment later in the committee markup.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that by 2015, about 8 million people would sign up for Rockefeller’s plan, though that number would decline as pay rates to medical providers rise above what Medicare pays after two years. Over 10 years, Rockefeller’s public option would save the federal government $50 billion, the CBO projects.

Conrad touted his proposal to create not-for-profit healthcare cooperatives and said that payments to medical providers under Rockefeller’s amendment would be too low and “would bankrupt every major hospital in my state. ... I can’t possibly support an amendment that does that.” Bingaman, a public option supporter who voted for a healthcare bill in the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee, said Rockefeller’s amendment is “not my preferred choice” for the same reason.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin HatchThe one part of ObamaCare that must be repealed now GOP seeks to meet referee’s rules on healthcare repeal Hatch shares gif of dumpster fire: ‘Checking in on Dodd Frank’ MORE (R-Utah) succinctly summed up the Republican view: “A new government plan is nothing more than a Trojan horse for a single-payer healthcare plan in Washington,” he said. “The end result would be a government takeover of our healthcare system.”

Finance Committee ranking member Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyTrump turns up heat on AG Sessions over recusal Overnight Cybersecurity: Senate Judiciary reportedly drops Manafort subpoena | Kushner meets with House Intel | House passes Russia sanctions deal | What to watch at 'hacker summer camp' Manafort agrees to speak with investigators after subpoena MORE (R-Iowa) wielded an old quotation from President Barack Obama’s 2004 Senate campaign, as well as quotes from Democratic Reps. Jan Schakowsky (Ill.) and Barney Frank (Mass.) and Washington Post columnist Ezra Klein as proof that liberals see the public option as a backdoor to eventually implementing a single-payer system. “The government is not a competitor. It’s a predator,” Grassley said.

The Finance Committee isn’t finished with the public option debate, however. Schumer’s amendment is due for a vote later Tuesday and Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe (Maine) could also raise her amendment that establish a “trigger” that would institute a public option in states with too few private insurance choices. In addition, Democratic and Republican senators have filed amendments to modify or strip Conrad’s language in the bill to create not-for-profit healthcare cooperatives as an alternative to private insurance.

But the committee remains unlikely to advance its legislation with a public option included. Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (D-Nev.) will have to hash out whether the healthcare reform bill that goes to the floor features a public option, however, because the HELP Committee already approved a bill that has one. Reid said last week that while he supports the public option, he think’s Snowe’s trigger proposal is a “doggone good idea” and preferable to Conrad’s co-ops.

Rockefeller declared that the fight is not over. “Public option is on the march,” he said.

The ultimate fate of the public option on the Senate floor is unclear. Liberals strongly back the idea, but centrist Democrats range from opposed to skeptical. But HELP Committee Chairman Tom HarkinTom HarkinDistance education: Tumultuous today and yesterday Grassley challenger no stranger to defying odds Clinton ally stands between Sanders and chairmanship dream MORE (D-Iowa) said Tuesday that he is confident that a public option could win a majority of votes in the Senate. “I have polled senators, and the vast majority of Democrats — maybe approaching 50 — support a public option,” Harkin said on the liberal "Bill Press Radio Show."

Michael O’Brien contributed to this article.