Senate Dems prep for hardball tactics in health debate after floor strategizing

Senate Democrats threatened to pull out the procedural stops to force votes on amendments to the healthcare reform bill on the floor as the GOP continues to object to advancing the legislation.

Moreover, Senate Democrats said after huddling on floor strategy Wednesday, the majority party is prepared to keep the Senate in session until Christmas or beyond in order to complete work on the bill before New Year's.

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"Unless the Republican leadership comes forward with a reasonable approach to these amendments, I think our patience is wearing thin," said Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinLive coverage: Senate GOP unveils its ObamaCare repeal bill Senate Dem offers patent reform bill FBI: Alexandria baseball shooter acted alone MORE (D-Ill.). "We’re just not going to sit here forever and watch this bill go down."

The Senate began its formal debate on the healthcare reform bill on Monday but has yet to hold a vote on the first two amendments to the legislation because of Republican objections to moving forward. Without an agreement from the minority, Democrats would either have to file cloture on each amendment, a process that takes days and requires 60 votes, or move to table the amendments, a procedural move that requires only 51 votes but that traditionally has been viewed by senators as harsh.

With Congress's scheduled winter holiday recess fast approaching, the slow start to the floor debate — not to mention unresolved policy issues dividing Democrats — threatens the Democratic leadership's plan to get the bill passed before 2010. Democratic senators said they were ready to stay in session as long as it takes.

"The Republican leadership is stalling us, so we have decided we are going right through Christmas," said Sen. Bill NelsonBill NelsonSenate panel unveils aviation bill with consumer protections, drone fix Driverless cars speed onto political agenda Biden leaves options on table for another White House bid MORE (D-Fla.). Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Chairman Tom HarkinTom HarkinDistance education: Tumultuous today and yesterday Grassley challenger no stranger to defying odds Clinton ally stands between Sanders and chairmanship dream MORE (D-Iowa) predicted Democrats would meet their target despite the sluggish floor debate. "We’re going to get this done before the new year comes in. In fact, I think we’re going to get it done before Christmas," Harkin said. Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDems see surge of new candidates Dems to grind Senate to a halt over ObamaCare repeal fight GOP fires opening attack on Dem reportedly running for Heller's Senate seat MORE (D-Nev.) has already warned senators that he plans to keep the Senate in session at night and on weekends.

So far this week, the Senate has been stuck debating an amendment authored by Sens. Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiBipartisan friendship is a civil solution to political dysfunction Dems press for paycheck fairness bill on Equal Pay Day After 30 years celebrating women’s history, have we made enough progress? MORE (D-Md.) and Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) to increase access to breast cancer screenings and an amendment offered by Sen. John McCainJohn McCainCoats: Trump seemed obsessed with Russia probe The Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Meghan McCain slams 'felon' Dinesh D'Souza over tweets mocking father's captivity MORE (R-Ariz.) to strip more than $400 billion in Medicare spending cuts from the legislation. Reid planned to hold votes on these amendments and two substitute amendments Wednesday afternoon, but Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellRocky rollout for Senate healthcare bill Overnight Healthcare: Latest on Senate healthcare bill | Four conservatives say they'll oppose | Obama slams bill | Health groups offer scathing criticism Sanders: I hope McConnell listened to protesters outside his office MORE (R-Ky.) objected Tuesday evening.

Republicans deny their intention is to stymie debate on the legislation, though a GOP leadership aide said their aim is to ensure that the healthcare reform bill is on the floor for at least as long as the several weeks Reid spent behind closed doors merging the healthcare bills approved by the Finance and HELP committees. The aide also noted that the Democratic Conference has 60 members and should be capable of overcoming any minority objections and that Democrats would move to table the amendments.

Democrats are strongly leaning toward moving to table the amendments if Republicans continue to object to holding votes, according to Harkin. "I just think that we’re going to have to, at some point, say enough is enough on the stall and we’re going to have to start voting; we’ll probably be tabling amendments," he said.