Senate Democrats claim ‘broad agreement’ on public option

Senate Democrats claim ‘broad agreement’ on public option
A group of liberal and centrist Senate Democrats have come to a “broad agreement” to resolve intra-party disputes over healthcare reform legislation, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidMcConnell not yet ready to change rules for Trump nominees The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate Trump to press GOP on changing Senate rules MORE (D-Nev.) said Tuesday evening.

The deal is intended to provide a compromise on the public insurance option that has drawn objections from several centrist Democrats and Independent Sen. Joe Lieberman (Conn.). The breakthrough could allow the Senate to move a healthcare bill before it breaks for Christmas.

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Though Reid did not provide details of the compromise on Tuesday night, it appears to involve the establishment of private, nonprofit health insurance programs that would be set up by the Office of Personnel Management, something members have recently been discussing. These programs would be run by private companies, but a new government insurance plan could be triggered if the private plans are not acceptable.

The deal would also allow people between 55 and 64 who do not have insurance through an employer to buy into Medicare.

Reid portrayed his announcement as a major milestone on the road to healthcare reform – and flatly denied that Democrats had jettisoned the proposal to create a government-run public option insurance program that is favored by liberals.

In a statement, Reid said the consensus Democrats had reached included a public option that would ensure competitition for insurance companies and choices for the public.

Reid will send a proposal to the Congressional Budget Office Wednesday for a cost estimate before senators take any additional steps, he said. “Hopefully we’ll know something from them by the end of the week,” said Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperSenate Dems to Mnuchin: Don't index capital gains to inflation Overnight Energy: Reporters barred from Day 2 of EPA summit | Dems blame Trump for gas price increases | Massachusetts to get new offshore wind farm Dems question whether administration broke law with citizenship question on census MORE (D-Del.), a centrist who supports the public option.

“It’s been a long journey,” Reid said Tuesday night. “But tonight we’ve overcome a real problem that we had. I think it’s fair to say that the debate [at] this stage has portrayed as a very divisive one and many have assumed that people of different perspectives can’t come together. But I think that what we were able to work out the last few days, culminating tonight, belays that.”

Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.), a staunch proponent of the public option, indicated that both sides made concessions. “You’re going to find nobody who’s happy,” he said, adding “I’m smiling.”

Despite Reid's sunny assessment of the state of the negotiations between centrist and liberal Democrats, one of the liberals who participated in the talks swiftly issued a statement reemphasizing his commitment to the public option -- and introducing a hint of skepticism into the proceedings.

“While I appreciate the willingness of all parties to engage in good-faith discussions, I do not support proposals that would replace the public option in the bill with a purely private approach," Sen. Russell Feingold (D-Wis.) said in a statement. 

The working group convened last week by Reid has been led by liberal Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — GOP centrists in striking distance of immigration vote Schumer: Trump should take Kim Jong Un off 'trip coin' Overnight Finance: Trump signs repeal of auto-loan policy | Justices uphold contracts that bar employee class-action suits | US, China trade war 'on hold' MORE (D-N.Y.) and centrist Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.).

The public option has been the major issue dividing the liberal majority of Democrats from a handful of centrist holdouts. Efforts by Reid and others, including Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe (Maine), to devise compromise versions of the public option failed to bring centrists such as Sens. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) and Lieberman on board with liberals.

In recent days, the liberal-centrist working group seemed to have set aside the public option in order to develop a set of new provisions with an eye toward satisfying all sides.

“What we’re trying to figure out here, certainly within our caucus and then maybe with Olympia, is: How much government involvement there should be in healthcare, how much private involvement. And there are disagreements,” Schumer said earlier Tuesday.

Flanking Reid at Tuesday evening’s impromptu press conference, however, Schumer cautioned against relying on earlier accounts. “You just know what was being talked about,” Schumer told reporters. “Things changed all the time.”

During the negotiating sessions in a conference room near Reid’s office, Schumer, Rockefeller, Feingold and Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSenate Dems to Mnuchin: Don't index capital gains to inflation Trump on collision course with Congress on ZTE Pa. health secretary: 'Sustainable funding' needed to attack opioid crisis MORE (Ohio) represented the liberal Democrats while Pryor, Carper and Nelson represented the centrist Democrats, along with Sens. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuLandrieu dynasty faces a pause in Louisiana Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Project Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns MORE (La.) and Blanche Lincoln (Ark.).

Even if the Democratic caucus unites behind whatever the working group devised, they may not be able to win over Snowe, whose support President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaTrump taps vocal anti-illegal immigration advocate for State Dept's top refugee job The federal judiciary needs more Latino judges Obama plans to use Netflix deal to stop political divisiveness MORE and other Democrats have intensely courted.

“It’s an expansion of government at a time in which we should be moving in the opposing direction, frankly,” Snowe said.


This story was updated at 9:07 a.m.