Dorgan’s departure opens tempting springboard to policy leadership

Dorgan’s departure opens tempting springboard to policy leadership

Sen. Byron Dorgan’s (D-N.D.) retirement has set off speculation over who will replace him as head of the Democratic Policy Committee, a tempting leadership springboard.

Democratic aides say several lawmakers serving in leadership positions, or promising up-and-comers such as Sens. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDem senators ask Bannon for more info about Breitbart contact Senate Dems want Trump to release ethics waivers, visitor logs Senators offer bill to boost police training in cyber crime MORE (R.I.) or Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownFive things to know about Trump's steel order Trump administration investigating effect of steel imports on US Mexico: Recent deportations 'a violation' of US immigration rules MORE (Ohio), could vie for the post.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidWeek ahead: House to revive Yucca Mountain fight Warren builds her brand with 2020 down the road 'Tuesday Group' turncoats must use recess to regroup on ObamaCare MORE (D-Nev.) will appoint Dorgan’s successor. As a result, lawmakers will not campaign among colleagues for the gavel but instead make quiet entreaties to their leader.

Sen. Robert MenendezRobert MenendezTaiwan deserves to participate in United Nations The way forward on the Iran nuclear deal under President Trump Corruption trial could roil NJ Senate race MORE (D-N.J.) is considered a likely candidate. During his career in the House, Menendez headed the Democratic Caucus. Reid appointed Menendez to the Finance Committee in January 2009, a move colleagues interpreted as a reward for his agreement to lead the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) this cycle.

One Democratic aide said the likelihood of Menendez landing the job depends on whether Reid promised him special consideration, in addition to the Finance appointment, in return for running the DSCC. The aide said Menendez’s claim would also hinge on his track record as campaign chief, a job that got a little harder with the retirements of Dorgan and Sen. Chris Dodd (Conn.), as well as tough challenges in Arkansas, Pennsylvania and Nevada.

Senate Democratic sources say the prestige of the Democratic Policy Committee chairmanship has slipped some in recent years. When then-Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle (S.D.) appointed Dorgan as chairman in 1999, many Senate insiders viewed it as the de facto No. 3 position in the leadership, behind the Democratic leader and whip.

A senior Democratic aide said the post is now viewed as No. 5 in the Democratic leadership. Reid, Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinTop Trump officials push border wall as government shutdown looms Top Dem: Shutdown over border wall would be 'height of irresponsibility' Sunday shows preview: Trump stares down 100-day mark MORE (Ill.), Democratic Conference Vice Chairman Charles SchumerCharles SchumerGOP fundraiser enters crowded primary for Pa. Senate seat Dems: Trump risks government shutdown over border wall Miners' union shouldn't look to feds to bail out mismanaged pension fund MORE (N.Y.) and Democratic Conference Secretary Patty MurrayPatty MurrayWeek ahead: Senate panel to vote on Trump's FDA pick Overnight Healthcare: GOP healthcare talks stall | Ryan takes backset to Pence in new repeal effort | FDA nominee grilled over industry ties Senators battle over FDA nominee's financial ties MORE (Wash.) occupy the top four slots. Reid, Durbin and Murray hold elected leadership posts while Schumer was appointed to his at the start last year, a reward for his service as DSCC chairman.

Even though Murray outranks Dorgan on the leadership ladder, she may be interested in his post because it comes with a staff of nearly 20 aides, a powerful perk in a chamber where manpower is limited. As Democratic Conference secretary, Murray has three additional staffers.

Other members of the Democratic leadership could vie for Dorgan’s job, say aides. They include Sen. Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowMedicare’s coverage decisions need more input from physicians Members help package meals at Kraft Heinz charity event in DC Senate braces for fallout over Supreme Court fight MORE (Mich.), chairwoman of the Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee, and the three deputy whips who meet weekly with Reid: Sens. Tom CarperTom CarperDems probe claims of religious bias in DHS 'trusted traveler' program Senate Dems want Trump to release ethics waivers, visitor logs Medicare’s coverage decisions need more input from physicians MORE (Del.), Bill NelsonBill NelsonBipartisan group demands answers on United incident Is Congress encroaching on Americans' Internet privacy? Trump's Labor pick endorsed by Hispanic lawyers MORE (Fla.) and Russ Feingold (Wis.).

A Democrat close to Stabenow, however, said her talents are well suited to the Steering Committee, which involves significant outreach to constituent groups. Colleagues respect Stabenow for her “people skills” and positive enthusiasm.

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerAnother day, another dollar for retirement advice rip-offs Carly Fiorina 'certainly looking at' Virginia Senate run Top Obama adviser signs with Hollywood talent agency: report MORE (Calif.), the chief deputy whip, and Sens. Jeff Bingaman (N.M.) and Blanche Lincoln (Ark.) also attend weekly leadership meetings with Reid but are not considered candidates because they each chair important policy committees.

Democratic aides say Whitehouse and Brown could fit well atop the policy committee. Both lawmakers are viewed as articulate advocates with enough partisan oomph to drive an agenda. Whitehouse and Brown took prominent roles during the healthcare debate.

Some aides think Sen. Barbara Mikulksi (Md.), who held the post of conference secretary from 1995 to 2005, may have interest. But a senior Democratic aide expressed doubt that Mikulski, who chairs the Appropriations Commerce, Justice, Science Subcommittee and typically carries a heavy policy load, would volunteer for the job.

Democratic aides say it is difficult to gauge lawmakers’ ambitions for the policy committee because few expected Dorgan’s sudden retirement. Dorgan announced on Tuesday he would leave the Senate in 2011 after giving his colleagues and staff little advance notice.

For years, Senate Democratic leaders closely guarded control of the policy committee.  Former leaders Lyndon Johnson (Texas), Mike Mansfield (Mont.), Robert Byrd (W.Va.), George Mitchell (Maine) and Daschle chaired the committee. So did Reid.

Dachle was the first chairman who did not serve concurrently as majority leader. Both he and Reid used it as a steppingstone to majority leader.