Senate Dems launch protest of GOP filibusters of Obama nominees

The protest is part of a broader effort to curb the GOP’s use of the filibuster, which has frustrated Democrats throughout this Congress.

The newly elected Democrats, including Sens. Mark WarnerMark WarnerSenate Intel panel to probe Trump team's ties to Russia The Hill's 12:30 Report Blackout forces brief delay in Pompeo confirmation hearing MORE (Va.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDems prepare to face off with Trump's pick to lead EPA Dem: EPA pick should answer questions before hearing Sessions: 'I have done no research into' Russian hacking MORE (R.I.), Jeanne Shaheen Jeanne ShaheenMattis's views on women in combat takes center stage Tillerson won't rule out Muslim registry Schumer: If Trump agrees Russia behind hacking, let's boost sanctions MORE (N.H.) and Roland Burris (Ill.), focused on Republican blockage of President Barack ObamaBarack ObamaObamas make MLK Day visit to homeless shelter Booker will attend inauguration Juan Williams: Race, Obama and Trump MORE’s nominees.

The Democratic classes of 2006 and 2008 met with Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidRyan says Trump, GOP 'in complete sync' on ObamaCare Congress has a mandate to repeal ObamaCare Keith Ellison picks ex-DNC Latino as press secretary MORE (D-Nev.) last week to discuss the possibility of filibuster reform. Reid has pledged to consider it as part of a new rules package for next year.

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Warner led off the round of floor speeches. As many as 10 senators are expected to participate.

“One thing has become clear to me since becoming sworn in a little over a year ago,” Warner said. “Some of the very safeguards that were created to make this a serious and responsible deliberative body have been abused in a way that damages this institution.”

Warner and his classmates argue that Republicans have abused the power to hold nominees and wage filibusters to block legislation.

The lawmakers related the stories of several nominees who have stalled in the Senate because of GOP objections. They highlighted nominees who are not themselves controversial but have been used as bargaining chips in other negotiations with the administration.

The Obama administration has 64 nominees pending in the Senate.

“These are nominees where, despite overwhelming committee votes, they languish on the calendar for months, often because one senator has a completely different gripe about a completely unrelated issue,” Warner said.

Some freshman Democrats, such as Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallSenate takes first step toward repealing ObamaCare Tillerson discloses assets worth up to 0M Dems seek more vetting for Trump nominees before hearings MORE (N.M.), support using the so-called constitutional option to adopt new rules for the chamber at the start of the 112th Congress.

The tactic would allow the chamber to adopt new rules through a simple majority vote. Other lawmakers, such as freshman Sen. Michael BennetMichael BennetCorrected — Lawmakers: Trump can't stop investigation of Clinton email case Cory Booker kicks off 2020 maneuvering in the Senate Dems to GOP leadership: Help us to fix ObamaCare MORE (D-Colo.), are pushing for filibuster reform to be included in the new rules package.

Whitehouse said “obstructionist tactics” are “preventing the government of the United States from doing its business.”

“It is wrong for all Americans who depend on an effective United States government,” Whitehouse said.