GOP candidates outraising Dems

GOP candidates outraising Dems

Republican Senate candidates outraised their Democratic rivals in the first quarter.

Much of that money went to non-incumbents.

ADVERTISEMENT
Republicans had five of the top six fundraisers among Senate candidates and only one of them was an incumbent — Sen. John McCainJohn McCainArmed Services chairman unveils .1B Asia-Pacific security bill Overnight Defense: Trump scolds NATO allies over spending | Flurry of leaks worries allies | Senators rip B Army 'debacle' | Lawmakers demand hearing on Saudi arms deal The case for protecting America's intelligence agency whistleblowers MORE (R-Ariz.).

The top 10 GOP Senate candidates outraised the top 10 Democratic candidates $20 million to $16 million, even though Democrats had six incumbents on that list and Republicans had two.

Several of the most successful GOP fundraisers have clear paths to the November election.

 Rep. Mark KirkMark KirkTaking the easy layup: Why brain cancer patients depend on it The Mideast-focused Senate letter we need to see The way forward on the Iran nuclear deal under President Trump MORE (R-Ill.) and former Reps. Rob PortmanRob PortmanSens submit bill to 'Hack the DHS' CBO score underlines GOP tensions on ObamaCare repeal Senate panel could pass new Russia sanctions this summer MORE (R-Ohio) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) headlined a big day for the GOP in three of the top Senate races on the map.

All raised more than $2 million. Kirk and Toomey raised about twice as much as the Democrats they face and Portman raised four times more than his main Democratic competition: Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher (D).

But other Republicans aren’t so lucky. They raised the money, but they have to get through a competitive primary first.

In Florida, former state House Speaker Marco RubioMarco RubioSenate panel could pass new Russia sanctions this summer McConnell on Trump: 'We could do with a little less drama' Taking the easy layup: Why brain cancer patients depend on it MORE (R) turned in the biggest quarter of all — $3.6 million — but he faces a primary with Gov. Charlie Crist, who raised $1.1 million.

In California, the three Republican candidates turned in their best quarters to date — a combined total of $4 million. But former Rep. Tom Campbell, businesswoman Carly Fiorina and state Assemblyman Chuck DeVore have to get past the June 8 primary. Meanwhile, Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerTime is now to address infrastructure needs Tom Steyer testing waters for Calif. gubernatorial bid Another day, another dollar for retirement advice rip-offs MORE (D-Calif.) raised a party best of $2.4 million and has a clear field to November.

Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson set a new personal best with $733,000 raised, but that only brought him to equal financial footing with GOP front-runner Rand PaulRand PaulSenate gears up for fight on Trump's 0B Saudi Arabia arms sale Paul: 0B Saudi arms deal ‘a travesty’ Senate feels pressure for summer healthcare vote MORE. Both of them outraised Lt. Gov. Dan Mongiardo, who is running against state Attorney General Jack Conway in the Democratic primary and raised only $312,000 in the first quarter. Conway’s numbers weren’t available as of press time.

In New Hampshire, former state Attorney General Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteWeek ahead: Comey firing dominates Washington GOP senators pitch Merrick Garland for FBI director Kelly Ayotte among candidates to be FBI director: report MORE (R), the party favorite, raised $671,000. But she also saw businessman Bill Binnie up his self-funding to about $3 million in the GOP primary. Rep. Paul Hodes (D-N.H.) raised $665,000 and has a clear primary.

Another self-funding Republican in Connecticut, former WWE CEO Linda McMahon, plugged an additional $8 million of her own money into the race, bringing her total self-funding to $14 million, while former Rep. Rob Simmons (R-Conn.) saw his receipts drop to $550,000. The winner gets state Attorney General Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalSenators push for enhanced powers to battle botnets Five things to know about Joe Lieberman Special counsel appointment gets bipartisan praise MORE, who raised $1.9 million in his first quarter as a candidate and is not expected to face a difficult primary.

McCain ramped up his fundraising big time after the entry of former Rep. J.D. Hayworth (R-Ariz.) into his primary, and was able to outraise the former congressman $2.2 million to $1 million.

In the race to face Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidGOP frustrated by slow pace of Trump staffing This week: Congress awaits Comey testimony Will Republicans grow a spine and restore democracy? MORE (D-Nev.), former state GOP Chairwoman Sue Lowden raised $500,000 and self-funded the same amount, while businessman Danny Tarkanian (R) raised $445,000. Reid raised $1.8 million.

Also out west, former Colorado Lt. Gov. Jane Norton (R) raised $816,000 but spent nearly all of it on her primary with Weld County District Attorney Ken Buck, who raised $119,000 and self-funded $100,000.

ADVERTISEMENT
In Indiana, former Sen. Dan CoatsDan CoatsGOP frustrated by slow pace of Trump staffing Budowsky: GOP summer of scandal The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Ind.) turned in a disappointing report in his first quarter as a candidate for his old seat. He raised $354,000 and self-funded $25,000, while likely Democratic nominee Rep. Brad Ellsworth (D-Ind.) raised $625,000. Coats faces a primary May 4; Ellsworth does not. Coats’s GOP competition had not released fundraising numbers as of press time.

In the Kansas GOP primary, Rep. Todd Tiahrt (R-Kan.) outraised Rep. Jerry MoranJerry MoranWeek ahead: Obama's CIA chief to testify on Russia probe IT modernization bill passes House Cost of key cyber bill drops by billions after revisions MORE (R-Kan.) for the first time, $375,000 to $346,000, in the race to replace Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kan.), who is running for governor.

Sen. Bob Bennett (R-Utah) easily outraised the GOP field running against him. He pulled in $739,000, compared to $115,000 for attorney Mike LeeMike LeeRepublicans go to battle over pre-existing conditions Senate gears up for fight on Trump's 0B Saudi Arabia arms sale Senate feels pressure for summer healthcare vote MORE and $20,000 for former congressional candidate Tim Bridgewater. Bennett, however, still faces peril in the May 8 Utah GOP nominating convention.

While a lot of money is flooding into the GOP primaries, it’s going to the Democrats in Arkansas. There, Lt. Gov. Bill Halter (D) raised $2 million for his race against Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.), who raised $1.3 million. On the GOP side, Rep. John BoozmanJohn BoozmanSenators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees Congress should let local communities set their own PACE GOP senators on Comey firing: Where they stand MORE (R-Ark.) did not release his totals as of press time, while state Sen. Gilbert Baker raised $155,000.

In other races, Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) outraised Rep. Roy BluntRoy BluntSenators unveil infrastructure investment bill GOP nears total exasperation with Trump GOP senators pitch Merrick Garland for FBI director MORE (R-Mo.) $1.5 million to $1.3 million, Rep. Mike Castle (R-Del.) outraised New Castle County Executive Chris CoonsChris CoonsDOJ pitches agreements to solve international data warrant woes Overnight Defense: Trump hits back over special counsel | US bombs pro-Assad forces | GOP chairman unveils proposed Pentagon buying reforms Special counsel appointment gets bipartisan praise MORE (D) $826,000 to $635,000, and Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyThe case for protecting America's intelligence agency whistleblowers Senate confirms Trump's first lower-court nominee Feinstein: Comey memos 'going to be turned over' MORE (R-Iowa) and challenger Roxanne Conlin (D) both raised about $630,000, with Conlin self-funding another $250,000.

Sens. Richard BurrRichard BurrSenate Intel Committee demands Trump campaign to turn over all docs: report Mr. President: Cooperation with Russian investigation is your best play Overnight Cybersecurity: Senate Intel chiefs get subpoena power in Russia probe | Trump orders probe of leaks | Lawmaker unveils 'hacking back' bill MORE (R-N.C.) and David VitterDavid VitterOvernight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator Former senator who crafted chemicals law to lobby for chemicals industry MORE (R-La.) — the two most vulnerable GOP incumbents — raised $1.5 million and $1.1 million, respectively. Vitter raised nearly twice as much as Rep. Charlie Melancon (D-La.), while Burr’s Democratic opponents didn’t release their totals as of press time.