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Sen. Brown would filibuster Dodd's financial regulatory reform legislation

Sen. Brown would filibuster Dodd's financial regulatory reform legislation

Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) defended his party’s opposition to financial regulatory reform and said he would join in a filibuster against the Democrats’ current bill.

“There are a lot of things in the Dodd bill that are just bad for small businesses,” he said on CBS’s “Face the Nation” Sunday, his first Sunday show interview since winning late Democratic Sen. Ted Kennedy's seat. “The present bill is not a good bill, period.”

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He attributed the tension over the proposed reforms to President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaGOP lawmaker: Dems not standing for Trump is 'un-American' Forget the Nunes memo — where's the transparency with Trump’s personal finances? Mark Levin: Clinton colluded with Russia, 'paid for a warrant' to surveil Carter Page MORE’s “political arm” taking over the debate.

On Saturday, Obama accused Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDems confront Kelly after he calls some immigrants 'lazy' McConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Defense: Latest on spending fight - House passes stopgap with defense money while Senate nears two-year budget deal | Pentagon planning military parade for Trump | Afghan war will cost B in 2018 MORE (Ky.) of making a "cynical and deceptive assertion” about the bill after meeting with Wall Street executives. McConnell said this week that the bill "not only allows for taxpayer-funded bailouts of Wall Street banks, it institutionalizes them."

Brown said that Republicans weren’t trying to block the president’s agenda.

McConnell’s “not saying no to financial reform,” Brown said. “We want banks to be banks. We don’t want them to be casinos.”

He added, “Let’s stop playing games and let’s stop politicizing it.”

Still, Brown wouldn’t commit to voting with the GOP against a different version of the legislation. “I look at each bill in an independent manner and vote accordingly.”

Asked by host Bob Schieffer why he didn’t attend this week’s Tea Party rally in Boston which featured former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R), Brown noted he was busy with official duties.

“I’ve been to rallies before,” he said, adding he has “respect” for the Tea Party and Palin.

Brown also dodged the question of whether he thought Obama is leading the country toward socialism. He called the president a “good man” and said, “He is an American; I know he cares deeply about our country.”

“I don’t think he’s making [the right] choices in dealing with the free market and free enterprise,” Brown said.

About his recent trip to Afghanistan, Brown said he met with President Hamid Karzai and left “convinced he was sincere.” He added, “I left Afghanistan hopeful.”

At the end of the interview, Schieffer noted that Brown’s eldest daughter, Ayla, a former "American Idol" contestant, had recently joined CBS News.