At least three senators who oppose secret holds have holds of their own

At least three senators who want to end the practice of placing secret holds on nominees and legislation have holds of their own, according to a survey by The Hill.

Sens. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.), Max BaucusMax BaucusChina moves to lift ban on US beef Overnight Healthcare: Zika fight stalls government funding talks | Census finds big drop in uninsured | Mental health bill faces wait Glover Park Group now lobbying for Lyft MORE (D-Mont.) and James InhofeJames InhofeFunding bill rejected as shutdown nears Senate Dems: Add Flint aid to spending deal Shutdown risk grows over Flint MORE (R-Okla.) are collectively blocking two Obama administration nominees and two bills as they push to end secret holds.

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Feingold and Baucus have signed on to a letter being drafted by Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillElection-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables The Trail 2016: Miss Universe crashes campaign McCaskill goes after Trump's weight MORE (D-Mo.) to Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidNo GOP leaders attending Shimon Peres funeral Overnight Regulation: Feds finalize rule expanding sick leave Anti-trade senators say chamber would be crazy to pass TPP MORE (D-Nev.) and Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellObama administration officials ramp up push for Pacific pact Overnight Defense: GOP leaders express concerns after 9/11 veto override | Lawmakers press for Syria 'plan B' | US touts anti-ISIS airstrikes Overnight Finance: Lawmakers float criminal charges for Wells Fargo chief | Scrutiny on Trump's Cuba dealings | Ryan warns of recession if no tax reform MORE (Ky.) on the subject, while Inhofe is co-sponsoring a resolution by Sens. Ron WydenRon WydenOvernight Healthcare: Watchdog says ObamaCare program made illegal payments Election-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Overnight Tech: TV box plan faces crucial vote | Trump transition team to meet tech groups | Growing scrutiny of Yahoo security MORE (D-Ore.) and Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyMcConnell blames dysfunction on Dems Four states sue to stop internet transition Senate passes bill to preserve sexual assault kits MORE (R-Iowa) to ban secret holds.

 The Hill contacted the offices of all 59 co-signers of McCaskill’s letter (including Wyden) as well as Inhofe and Grassley. All 61 senators or their offices responded to requests for comment.

Staffers for Feingold, Baucus and Inhofe maintained that their holds have not been a secret. However, Feingold was the only one of the trio who had announced his holds publicly before The Hill conducted its survey.

 Reid supports the effort to crack down on holds. Earlier this month, Reid claimed that Republicans were the only ones obstructing bills or nominees.

“There are no Democratic holds. They’re gone,” Reid said on May 4. “There are scores and scores of Republican holds. They have been asked to follow the law and they refuse to do so. The law is, after a set number of days, they’re supposed to state in the Congressional Record why they have the holds. They refuse to do that.”

According to the Senate’s Executive Calendar, there are 108 judicial or executive branch nominations pending before the chamber, dating back to June 2009. The only senator to publicly identify his holds: Tom CoburnTom CoburnRyan calls out GOP in anti-poverty fight The Trail 2016: Words matter Ex-Sen. Coburn: I won’t challenge Trump, I’ll vote for him MORE (R-Okla.), who is blocking six administration nominees. Coburn published his holds on the Executive Calendar.

Feingold is blocking the appointment of Federal Election Commission nominee John Sullivan out of concern that the commission’s two other vacancies are still unfilled, as well as a bill by Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinElection-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Senators already eyeing changes to 9/11 bill after veto override WH tried to stop Intel Dems' statement on Russian hacking: report MORE (D-Calif.) to crack down on gang violence. Feingold said in his May 6 floor speech that he has suggestions to improve the bill.

Inhofe is blocking the nomination of Solomon Watson to be the Army’s general counsel, citing Watson’s stint as a legal adviser to The New York Times, which coincided with the Times’s investigations of the Bush administration’s domestic surveillance programs. Inhofe’s office said the senator made his concerns public during a recent Armed Services Committee hearing, and an aide for the senator said he simply wants “greater scrutiny” of the nomination.

 Holds are so ingrained in Senate tradition that some senators forget they placed them — as with both Baucus and Inhofe. Baucus told The Hill that he has no holds in place, only to be corrected later by his office, which stated he is blocking a water compact because he wants to coordinate it with a separate water compact specific to Montana. Inhofe also forgot about his hold and was initially unaware of it when asked by The Hill.

 Although Grassley and Inhofe have signed on to Wyden’s resolution, the McCaskill letter was signed by only two GOP senators, Susan CollinsSusan CollinsElection-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Swing-state Republicans play up efforts for gun control laws Reid knocks GOP on gun 'terror loophole' after attacks MORE of Maine and Scott Brown of Massachusetts.

 “It’s legitimate to put a hold on a bill or a nominee, but a senator ought to be willing to publicly identify him- or herself,” Collins told The Hill. “I’ve never thought secret holds are a good practice. I thought we put an end to them a few years ago when we voted on this issue, and yet they continue to occur.”

 The Senate implemented a rule in 2007 that senators had to publicly acknowledge any holds after six business days. But enforcing the rule has proven difficult. Reid earlier this month said he and Wyden are considering crackdown measures, such as referral to the Senate’s Ethics Committee.

Reid said the only other alternative is to file a cloture petition to lift each hold — a cumbersome step that requires several days of legislative delay.

 Collins said other Republicans would have signed McCaskill’s letter, but that it was hurriedly offered to only a few GOP senators.

 “I don’t think there was an effort to get widespread signatures on it,” she said.

McCaskill said the letter is still available, and that she doesn’t plan to send it to Reid and McConnell until she has 67 signatures — the number of senators required to change the chamber’s rules.

Grassley indicated he would have signed the letter, and a Grassley aide noted the senator has been working on the issue since 1996. Meanwhile, an Inhofe aide said the senator supports a stronger measure, such as legislation, instead of a letter.

“We’re not eliminating holds, we’re just eliminating secrecy,” Grassley said. “The public’s business ought to be public, and if you’re a senator and you want to put a hold on a bill, you ought to have guts enough to say it.”

Wyden last week lashed out at Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) for attempting to add a border security measure to his and Grassley’s secret-holds amendment. Wyden subsequently withdrew his amendment.