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Graham opposes deal on ‘Don’t ask, don’t tell'

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Tech: Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up hack | Apple considers battery rebates | Regulators talk bitcoin | SpaceX launches world's most powerful rocket Overnight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach MORE (R-S.C.) has said he will oppose a vote to repeal the military’s “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. The vote could come to the Senate floor as soon as June.

“I do not support the idea of repealing ‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ before our military members and commanders complete their review,” said Graham in a statement. “This so-called compromise would repeal the legislation first, then receive input form the military."

President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaGOP lawmaker: Dems not standing for Trump is 'un-American' Forget the Nunes memo — where's the transparency with Trump’s personal finances? Mark Levin: Clinton colluded with Russia, 'paid for a warrant' to surveil Carter Page MORE reached a deal with Democrats on Capitol Hill earlier this week that would let lawmakers vote now to repeal the policy that prohibits gays from serving openly in the military.

The armed forces have yet to complete a study of the impact of the possible repeal on combat readiness, sparking the ire of some members of the GOP.

“This is not the proper way to change any policy, particularly something as controversial as ‘Don’t ask, don’t tell,’ " said Graham, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

If passed, gays would be allowed to serve openly once Obama and senior military leaders give final approval.

Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Defense Secretary Robert Gates voiced support for changing the policy when they testified before the Armed Services Committee earlier this year.