Federal judge stops Indiana from implementing controversial voter purge law

Federal judge stops Indiana from implementing controversial voter purge law
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A federal judge in Indiana blocked the state on Friday from implementing a law that would purge Indiana voters from the state's voter rolls if they appeared on a controversial voter tracking system.

Reuters reported that U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt ruled in favor of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on Friday, finding that the law violated the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA).

The law relies on the Kansas Secretary of State's Crosscheck system that matches voters by name and date of birth and flags potential duplicate voters. Critics of the Crosscheck system say it reports a majority of false positives — particularly among minority voters — and leads to the disenfranchisement of eligible voters.

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“While the defendants have a strong public interest in protecting the integrity of voter registration rolls and the electoral process, they have other procedures in place that can protect that public interest that do not violate the NVRA,” Pratt wrote in granting a preliminary injunction.

With Pratt's injunction, the state is not allowed to enforce the law while the lawsuit makes its way through the court.

The ACLU lauded the court victory in a statement to Reuters, condemning officials who administer the Crosscheck system of trying to "suppress the vote."

“Hoosier-elected officials should do all that they can to promote voter engagement,” said ACLU Indiana Executive Director Jane Heneger. “Today’s ruling condemns actions to the contrary that threaten to suppress the vote. Voting is our constitutional right and we must ensure every voice is heard.”

Indiana's secretary of state did not offer comment to Reuters Friday evening on whether the state would appeal the decision.

The Crosscheck system is administered by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who previously led President TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Trump claims tapes of him saying the 'n-word' don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE's commission to investigate his unfounded claims that millions of illegal votes were cast in Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down Signs grow that Mueller is zeroing in on Roger Stone Omarosa claims president called Trump Jr. a 'f--- up' for releasing Trump Tower emails MORE's favor during the 2016 election.