GOP senator predicts ‘fiscal crisis’ without changes to Medicaid

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) on Sunday defended the proposed Medicaid cuts included in the Senate GOP’s healthcare bill. He said the cuts prevent the program’s cost from “ballooning” the deficit over time.

"If we leave it on the path it's on now, we will have a fiscal crisis," Toomey said on "Sunday Morning Futures.”

“Our deficits will balloon to the point that they are completely unmanageable," he added.

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Toomey, who was one of the few lawmakers who helped craft the repeal-and-replace bill behind closed doors, said the new bill will help prevent Medicaid from "growing out of control."

The legislation puts a new cap in place that would prevent Medicaid spending from rising as quickly as medical costs. States would then either have to pick up the bill and pay out of their own state budgets to make up for the difference or scale back Medicaid enrollment or services. 

Toomey said that ObamaCare is a failed healthcare system that needs to be replaced.

“ObamaCare has failed us terribly, it continues to fail and we need to move in a different direction," Toomey continued, saying the GOP's new version is a "step in the right direction."

The Pennsylvania lawmaker said Senate efforts to get enough support for the bill is a “work in progress.” There are several Republican senators who oppose the bill in its current form.

Many Democrats and some GOP lawmakers such as Sens. Rob PortmanRob PortmanOPINION | They told us to abandon ObamaCare — then came the resistance Regulatory experts push Senate leaders for regulatory reform Conservative group to give GOP healthcare holdouts ‘Freedom Traitors Award’ MORE (Ohio), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsThe GOP Wonder Women who saved healthcare for 22 million Senate heads to new healthcare vote with no clear plan OPINION | GOP healthcare attack is a vendetta against President Obama MORE (Maine) and Dean HellerDean HellerOvernight Healthcare: CBO predicts 22M would lose coverage under Senate ObamaCare replacement 40 million fewer people expected to vote in 2018, study finds The Memo: Trump tries to bend Congress to his will MORE (Nev.) have voiced concerns about the bill.

The Congressional Budget Office analysis of the measure found that it would leave 22 million more people uninsured over a decade.  

The GOP opposition to the bill in the Senate forced Republican leadership to delay a vote until after the July Fourth recess.