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Parkland students: 'March for Our Lives' showed 'our voices matter'

Parkland students: 'March for Our Lives' showed 'our voices matter'
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Two organizers of the “March for Our Lives” said they expect Saturday’s anti-gun rallies to energize young voters through this year’s midterms and beyond.

“I think the fact that young people everywhere are taking initiative, standing up and leading in their communities showed we learned our voices matter,” Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Cameron Kasky said on “Fox News Sunday.”

“The strongest thing we have going for us is this is a youth movement,” fellow student Delaney Tarr added. “If we can encourage these people to take action, to be participating in our society and in our politics, that’s going to continue to get voters to turn out.”

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Hundreds of thousands of people on Saturday took part in the “March for Our Lives” in Washington, D.C., and other cities across the country. The event called for stricter gun laws and an end to gun violence.

Students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., organized the rally in response to a Feb. 14 shooting there that left 17 people dead. 

The Trump administration has taken steps to ban bump stocks, an accessory that allows certain weapons to fire at a more rapid rate, signed off on funding for improved background checks and has urged states to pass gun legislation.

However, Congress has not taken action on enacting universal background checks, raising the age requirement to purchase a rifle or banning assault weapons, each of which Parkland students have called for.

Kasky said Sunday he was "not impressed at all" with the federal response to the Parkland shooting.

"It's important to make schools safer, but this doesn't just happen in schools," he said.

He added that he'd give the state of Florida a "crisp C-" grade for legislation it passed in recent weeks to raise the age requirement and enact a three-day waiting period for gun purchases.