Trump seeks to stop lawsuit from ‘Apprentice’ contestant

Trump seeks to stop lawsuit from ‘Apprentice’ contestant
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President Trump is seeking to stop a lawsuit filed by a former contestant on “The Apprentice,” arguing a state lawsuit can’t be brought against a sitting president.

Marc Kasowitz, Trump’s longtime attorney, plans to file briefs in New York’s Supreme Court seeking to stop the lawsuit brought by Summer Zervos, according to a Tuesday Hollywood Reporter report.

Zervos filed the lawsuit in New York in January, claiming that her reputation was damanged when Trump denied her claims of sexual assault.

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Zervos alleged that Trump attempted to kiss her two times in 2007 and then attacked her in a hotel room.  

Gloria Allred, Zervos’s lawyer, said Trump “knowingly, intentionally and maliciously” went after Zervos by calling the two “liars.”

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Kasowitz plans to argue that the Constitution’s Supremacy Clause bars the president from state lawsuits.

Kasowitz also argues that the Supreme Court did not decide in Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonTrump’s first year in office was the year of the woman Can a president be impeached for non-criminal conduct? Dems search for winning playbook MORE v. Paula Jones whether a lawsuit, causing delay in the president’s ability to perform his duties, could stand, according to the Reporter.

In the Jones sexual harassment suit, Clinton's lawyers said litigation against the president should wait until he leaves office, except in outstanding cases.

The Supreme Court ruled that a president is not immune to private litigation, but Justice John Paul Stevens, writing on behalf of the court, also said the cases should be decided as early as possible so the president is not prevented from performing his duties.

“[I]mmunity questions should be decided at the earliest possible stage of the litigation" because of the "singular importance of the President's duties,” Stevens wrote.

Kasowitz plans to use this part of Steven’s court response in his attempt to halt Zervos’s lawsuit.  

“Moreover, as in Clinton v. Jones, the public interest mandates that the immunity issue be resolved before proceeding further,” the attorney writes, according to The Hollywood Reporter.