Paul Ryan: Intel leaks 'the problem of the leaker, not the journalist'

Paul Ryan: Intel leaks 'the problem of the leaker, not the journalist'
© Greg Nash

Speaker of the House Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump vows to stand with House GOP '1,000 percent' on immigration Heckler yells ‘Mr. President, f--- you’ as Trump arrives at Capitol Hoyer: GOP centrists 'sold out' Dreamers MORE (R-Wis.) defended journalists Friday, saying that while intelligence leaks compromise national security, it's "the problem of the leaker, not the journalist."

"Leaks are concerning because leaks can often compromise national security, but that’s the problem of the leaker not the journalist," Ryan said at an event in Muskego, Wis., on Friday afternoon.

Ryan's comment comes just hours after Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMadeleine Albright slams Trump over immigration New Hampshire GOP gov: I won’t send National Guard troops to ‘separate families’ Overnight Defense: States pull National Guard troops over family separation policy | Senators question pick for Afghan commander | US leaves UN Human Rights Council MORE announced a governmentwide crackdown on leakers.

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Sessions warned that the media could be a part of that crackdown, and the Justice Department could ask for sources behind leaks. The investigation will include a review of the Justice Department's policies on subpoenas for media outlets that publish sensitive information.



“We respect the important role that the press plays and will give them respect, but it is not unlimited. They cannot place lives at risk with impunity,” Sessions said. “We must balance their role with protecting our national security and the lives of those who serve in our intelligence community, the armed forces and all law abiding Americans.”

“I have this message for the intelligence community: The Department of Justice is open for business,” he added. “And I have this warning for would-be leakers: Don’t do it.”

The top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerWray defends FBI after 'sobering' watchdog report Top Dems: IG report shows Comey's actions helped Trump win election Dem senator: Trump at G-7 made me ‘embarrassed for our country’ MORE (D-Va.), said on Thursday that Congress should probe the leak of transcripts of President Trump's phone calls with the leaders of Mexico and Australia, a leak both political parties have condemned.