Establishment will pay at polls if Congress kills Trump's agenda

Establishment will pay at polls if Congress kills Trump's agenda
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This week marks the ninth anniversary of the enactment of the federal government’s infamous $700 billion bank bailout known as the Troubled Asset Relief Program. From the moment President George W. Bush signed the bill into law on Oct. 3, 2008, politics in America would never be the same. Our government’s willingness to bailout our nation’s leading financial institutions, the most wealthy and powerful among us, at hardworking taxpayer’s expense, kickstarted a new era of politics in America that started with the formation of the Tea Party in 2009 and culminated with the election of the ultimate political outsider, Donald Trump, as president in 2016. Fast forward to October 2017 and the movement continues with more ferocity than ever, because it seems Washington still hasn’t gotten the message.

The 2008 bailout serves as an exclamation point for the forgotten men and women in America, exemplified by the working folks in the Rust Belt, that Washington politicians in both parties were no longer looking out for their interests. The election of radical leftist and big government advocate President Obama only exacerbated the problem as the anti-Washington coalition of voters began to take shape in 2009. At the time of the bailout and Obama’s first election, our national debt stood at a once unthinkable $10 trillion.

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When the ObamaCare nightmare deemed and passed Congress, at the time led by Nancy Pelosi and Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE, in March 2010 using questionable means, that was enough to pave the way for the election of change agents senators like Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSupreme Court takes on same-sex wedding cake case House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama Trump really will shrink government, starting with national monuments MORE and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLexington mayor launches bid for Congress Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics Meet the Iran hawk who could be Trump's next secretary of State MORE, with Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzDebbie Wasserman Schultz marks 10 years as breast cancer survivor Foreign agent registration is no magical shield against Russian propaganda Let Trump be Trump and he'll sail through 2020 MORE following them shortly thereafter. While those victories were consequential, the Washington establishment was still determined to operate business as usual. Republicans went ahead and nominated Mitt Romney, who couldn’t appeal to the growing anti-Washington voters in the electoral vote rich states that mattered. Congress continued to pass unreadable spending bills worth billions and billions of dollars with little meaningful debate.

By April 2014, our national debt had exploded to $17 trillion and Trump made his appearance at the New Hampshire Freedom Summit talking about illegal immigration and border control as Congress steamed ahead and the “gang of eight” discussed amnesty. The Republican establishment started to fight back as they encouraged Democrats to vote for career politician Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranObstruction of justice watch: Trump attacks the FBI America isn't ready to let Sessions off his leash The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill MORE over conservative challenger Chris McDaniel in the Republican runoff for the U.S. Senate in Mississippi.

Even with the election of more conservative change agents like Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSasse: RNC help for Roy Moore 'doesn't make any sense' Sasse calls RNC decision to resume support for Moore 'bad' and 'sad' GOP senator: Flake donation to Alabama Dem 'a bad idea' MORE and Tom CottonTom CottonGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration Grassley offers DACA fix tied to tough enforcement measures Five things senators should ask Tom Cotton if he’s nominated to lead the CIA MORE to the Senate in 2014, the defenders of the status quo in Washington refused to open their eyes to what was happening across America. In June 2015, Trump entered the presidential race and the political class in Washington was repulsed. They would not take the Trump movement seriously even with the ouster of John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerJohn Feehery: A political forest fire Trump's pick for Federal Reserve chief is right choice at right time The two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery MORE as speaker by conservative congressman Mark Meadows and his Freedom Caucus.

Republican leaders in Congress continued to kick the can down the road on government spending and refused to stand up to the dangerous Obama agenda. Their excuse at the time was “wait until we have a Republican president” and then they would pass everything on the conservative agenda. In November 2016, the Republican leadership in Congress got their wish and a Republican was elected President of the United States. Trump supporters across the country were ready to see their agenda passed by Congress and signed into law by the new president. With the exception of the confirmation of Justice Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, the Republican-controlled Congress to date has not gotten the job done.

In early September, the national debt breached $20 trillion and the D.C. club didn’t blink an eye. They passed yet another debt ceiling increase and another three-month continuing resolution government spending bill, which is exactly the opposite of what the voters want. The White House’s frustration must be reaching the boiling point when you consider Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PencePence allies worried he'll be called to answer questions from Mueller: report Trump thought it was ‘low class’ for Pence to bring pets to VP residence: report Pence told RNC he could replace Trump on ticket after 'Access Hollywood' tape came out: report MORE’s chief of staff Nick Ayers recent remarks to major GOP donors that they should consider a purge of establishment Republicans in Congress who refuse to help pass the very agenda they campaigned on.

The coalition of anti-Washington voters around the country has taken notice. Judge Roy Moore’s victory in the recent U.S. Senate runoff election in Alabama is evidence that even with the election of President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Democrat slams Donald Trump Jr. for ‘serious case of amnesia’ after testimony Skier Lindsey Vonn: I don’t want to represent Trump at Olympics Poll: 4 in 10 Republicans think senior Trump advisers had improper dealings with Russia MORE, the Washington establishment continues with more business as usual. Nine years after the federal government’s $700 billion bailout, career politicians in Congress still haven’t listened, but maybe as primary season approaches voters will once again send them a message.

David N. Bossie is president of Citizens United and a contributor to Fox News. He served as President Donald Trump’s deputy campaign manager.