Civil Rights

Hypocrites of late night won't call out sexual harassment when a liberal is to blame

If you're looking for the network late-night hosts to alter the focus of their monologues from anything and everything Trump, keep looking.

Because after the silence of the lambs of late-night on Thursday night, don't expect these morally-superior cable news partisans disguised as comedians to explore the New York Times' bombshell report on Thursday that documented in detail allegations of at least eight instances of sexual harassment by media mogul Harvey Weinstein against actresses and female staffers.

Weinstein, 63, is similar to many other executives in Hollywood in that he greatly prefers Democrats over Republicans to the tune of nearly $300,000 in donations over the years. And that's fine.

But where's it isn't fine is when the increasingly one-trick ponies that are Stephen Colbert, Jimmy Kimmel, Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers ran from making even one joke on a night when the Weinstein story broke, as was the case Thursday night when all provided its audience with the usual heavy dose of Trump bashing.

Hypocrisy? It's likely dripping down your screen as you read this.

Compare Thursday night's late-night Weinstein blackout to a time not too long ago in 2015 when the late head of Fox News, Roger Ailes, had been accused of treating some women who reported to him the same way Weinstein allegedly did. The jokes and the grandstanding were plentiful. Or compare it to the free-for-all following similar allegations against Bill O'Reilly. Same deal.

Note: Nobody is saying not to make any jokes in these situations. Public figures are fair game even in situations when guilty until being proven innocent. But the reasonable expectation is at least to be consistent if the Colberts and Kimmels of the world continue to not only make more political speeches than jokes - and portraying themselves and the party they represent as better, more caring, more sensitive to the needs of the powerless.

Need more hypocrisy? Look no further than media darling Lisa Bloom, who was given seemingly unlimited airtime in representing female clients against Roger Ailes and Bill O'Reilly.

In a related story, you'll never guess who Bloom is advising now.

Hint: His full name starts with "Harvey."

Bloom told ABC's George Stephanopoulos on "Good Morning America" Friday that she's "working with a guy who has behaved badly over the years, who is genuinely remorseful."

So in Bloom's world, if you're sorry, all is forgiven.

Or just maybe, just perhaps, there's another reason for Bloom suddenly advising a man accused of sexual harassment after making a career of representing women making the accusation.

You know, like money.

Turns out Bloom has a working relationship with Weinstein. Six months ago, she shared on Twitter that Harvey, along with Jay-Z, would be adapting her book "Suspicion Nation" into a TV miniseries.

"I think Harvey has acknowledged that, yes, that there was misconduct over a period of years," Bloom said on ABC before stunningly adding that "the term 'sexual harassment' ... is a legal term," and now prefers to use in this situation "workplace misconduct."

We're not making this up.

So will there be any Lisa Bloom jokes coming down the pike on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on CBS, Jimmy Kimmel Live on ABC or the Tonight Show on NBC?

Likely not. Nor will there much at all if anything on Weinstein.

Hypocrisy comes in many forms.

The Silence of the Lambs was a great movie back in the early 90s.

It's also now the mantra of patently phony late-night hosts who are hilariously redefining the essence of selective outrage.

Joe Concha (@JoeConchaTV) is a media reporter for The Hill.

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