Opinion: Time for Democrats to stand up to Republican filibuster bullies

As a brazen political strategy to make Democrats’ 54-vote control of the Senate meaningless, the filibuster continues working to perfection for Senate Republicans. 

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There is no reason for them to stop because Democrats, despite their majority, are afraid to use their powers to fix the broken rule.

But just as spring brings cherry blossoms to D.C., Democrats in the leadership are now showing budding signs of being willing to fight the GOP’s corrupt use of filibusters.

At a forum hosted by the Wall Street Journal last Wednesday, Senate Democratic Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSenators who have felt McCain's wrath talk of their respect for him Graham and Kushner met to discuss immigration differences: report Trump's FBI nominee passes committee, heads to full Senate MORE (Ill.) for the first time spoke with deep regret about having failed to back filibuster reform in January at the start of the new Congress.

“I supported Harry’s (Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (D-Nev.) decision to try to work out a bipartisan agreement on the rules, because I think it’s in the best interests of the institution, but I can tell you the abuse that we’ve seen since then is not encouraging at all,” Durbin said. 

“I think we need to get back to regular order, and that means stopping the abuse of the filibuster.”

When pressed for specifics, Durbin answered the Senate may have to “change the rules.”

Durbin was reacting to a move by Sen. Jerry MoranJerry MoranThe Memo: Trump tries to bend Congress to his will Tensions linger between Trump and GOP lawmakers Trump plays hardball on ObamaCare repeal MORE (R-Kan.) to block a vote on the Senate’s Continuing Resolution — a temporary measure to fund the government through the end of this fiscal year and avoid a government shutdown. 

Moran demanded a vote on his amendment to prevent some upcoming sequestration budget cuts, in exchange for allowing the vote on the continuing resolution to go through.

Reid also spoke in anger about Moran’s move: “It is things like that that will cause the Senate to have to reassess all the rules because right now they accomplish so little.” 

Earlier this month, Reid showed the first sign of being willing to fight on filibusters. 

He openly voiced regret for not backing filibuster reform after the GOP’s silent filibuster of  one of President Obama’s judicial nominees, Caitlin Halligan. 

“On one hand, my Republican colleagues did not practice regular order. Instead they demanded a 60-vote threshold for confirmation of a qualified nominee, Caitlin Halligan, to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit,” Reid said. 

“Republicans hid behind a cloture vote — a filibuster by another term — to prevent a simple up or down vote on this important nomination. They took the easy way out.”

Obama withdrew Halligan's nomination last Friday, citing the "unjustified filibuster."

But for all the sparks of fight and anger now coming from the Democrats, the GOP is planning more filibusters. 

The Republicans are in the planning stage of filibustering several members of the president’s new slate of nominees to head federal agencies.

The president’s nominee to head the Environmental Protection Agency, Gina McCarthyGina McCarthyLiberal group files lobbying complaint against Pruitt Trump’s budget prioritizes polluters over people Trump pulls US out of Paris deal: What it would mean MORE, has already had a hold placed on her nomination by Sen. Roy BluntRoy BluntOvernight Healthcare: Trump plays hardball on ObamaCare | Senators revive negotiations | CBO says repeal without replace would cost 32M insurance White House working with moderates on new Medicaid proposal Senate GOP revives negotiation over ObamaCare repeal and replace MORE (R-Mo.)

Never mind that McCarthy served as an environmental policy adviser to Republican Mitt Romney when he was the Governor of Massachusetts. 

Never mind that the Senate Environment and Public Works committee had not even scheduled a date for McCarthy’s confirmation hearings yet where she could answer the Republican’s concerns.

The same playbook is being used against Obama’s nominee to be Secretary of Labor, Thomas PerezThomas E. PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE

Republican Sens. David VitterDavid VitterOvernight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator Former senator who crafted chemicals law to lobby for chemicals industry MORE (La.) and Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyJill Stein looped into widening investigation of Russia and Trump Jr. connections Grassley calls on 'leaker' to release Sessions-Russia conversation Trump Jr., Manafort reach deal to avoid public hearing next week MORE (Iowa) have vowed to block Perez’s nomination.

In an interview with the National Review Online, Grassley, who is the top Republican on the Senate Judiciary panel, laid down this marker: “At this point, I want to wait until I get answers to the questions, if I don’t get answers to the questions, I’ll work to block his nomination.” 

Keep in mind this Senate GOP caucus has already broken with hundreds of years of Senate precedent and filibustered the nomination of a Cabinet secretary, Chuck HagelChuck HagelPentagon withholding nuclear weapons inspection results: report Lobbying World The US just attacked Syria. So where's Congress? MORE for Secretary of Defense. 

They used the same filibuster weapon — with Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulSunday shows preview: Scaramucci makes TV debut as new communication chief The Hill's 12:30 Report Senate heads to new healthcare vote with no clear plan MORE (R-Ky.) leading the way — to injure and delay John Brennan’s nomination as CIA Director.

The GOP filibuster strategy is proving to be the tool of choice for draining momentum from President Obama’s reelection mandate. 

It stops the Democratic majority in the senate from controlling the Senate. And it makes it difficult for the president to put his nominees in place to govern the country.

The GOP is betting that voters will blame Democrats for the dysfunction in Congress as much as they blame the GOP.  

And so far, the bet is paying off, because the press is failing to call out the GOP for an extreme and nasty political strategy of demanding a super-majority of 60 votes —the votes required to break a filibuster — to get anything done.

There is, however, one thing that could end the GOP blockade and shake up the ossified politics of D.C. 

And that is filibuster reform.

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyOPINION | Shailene Woodley: US should run on renewable energy by 2050 Gore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Callista Gingrich touts Trump's commitment to environment despite Paris deal pullout MORE (D-Ore.) and Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallFCC chair: Trump hasn't tried to intervene on Time Warner merger Overnight Finance: GOP divided over welfare cuts in budget | Lawmaker loses M on pharma stock he pitched | Yellen says another financial crisis unlikely in our lifetimes Overnight Regulation: EPA moves to repeal Obama water rule | Labor chief to review overtime rule | Record fine for Google MORE (D-N.M.) want to require senators to come to the floor to speak during a filibuster. 

No more silent filibusters based on threats.

To be sure, robust congressional oversight is an essential part of our democracy. 

But using oversight to justify twisting the filibuster rule into a weapon to obstruct a twice-elected president’s ability to govern undermines our democracy. 

How long will it take for Reid and Durbin to fix the problem?