Player of the Week: Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)

This is an important week for Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Tech: TV box plan faces crucial vote | Trump transition team to meet tech groups | Growing scrutiny of Yahoo security Overnight Finance: McConnell offers 'clean' funding bill | Dems pan proposal | Flint aid, internet measure not included | More heat for Wells Fargo | New concerns on investor visas Senate Dems call for investigation into Wells Fargo's wage practices MORE (D-N.Y.) and her legislative effort to reduce sexual assault in the military.

Since unveiling her bill in May, Gillibrand has been building up support for her legislation that would remove sexual assault cases from the military chain of command.

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She has attracted 47 backers in the Senate, but that’s not enough to pass the upper chamber.

For Gillibrand, a former House member who has indicated an interest in running for the White House, combating sexual assaults has become her signature issue.

But she is pitted against powerful lawmakers, including Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl LevinCarl LevinThe Fed and a return to banking simplicity What Our presidential candidates can learn from Elmo Zumwalt Will there be a 50-50 Senate next year? MORE (D-Mich.).

Levin and other senators say Gillibrand’s legislation could make it worse for victims and would torpedo the Pentagon’s system of justice.

The Pentagon opposes the Gillibrand measure.

Trying to round up more votes, Gillibrand last week suggested she was considering changing her bill, but supporters balked and Gillibrand backtracked.

In an interview on ABC’s “This Week,” she said, “We’re going to stick to the original plan because it’s a better bill.”

A competing plan is being spearheaded by Levin and Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillClinton campaign chair jabs at Trump's age Election-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables The Trail 2016: Miss Universe crashes campaign MORE (D-Mo.). In recent days, the debate has intensified amid dueling press conferences.

A bipartisan agreement to merge the Gillibrand and McCaskill bills, which had seemed possible earlier this year, now seems unlikely.

The competing pieces of legislation could be debated this week as part of the Senate’s debate on the defense authorization bill. That has caused a headache for Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThe missed opportunity of JASTA States urged to bolster election security How the White House got rolled on the Saudi-9/11 bill MORE (D-Nev.), who has to decide how to handle the intraparty fight.

Reid usually defers to his committee chairmen. Gillibrand has waged an impressive battle, but she doesn’t appear to have the votes to trump Levin.