Player of the Week: Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.)

Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayWeek ahead: Senators near deal to stabilize ObamaCare markets Policymaking commission offers a glimmer of hope in hyper-partisan Washington Dems call on DeVos to work with CFPB to protect student borrowers MORE (D-Wash.) faces two significant challenges this week.

She is working on a spending bill that would avert a government shutdown, and she is simultaneously crafting a budget resolution that will be difficult to pass.

The appropriation measure is expected to clear Congress with bipartisan support before Washington runs out of appropriated money later this month.

But the budget measure is not going to be so easy.

Senate Democrats haven’t passed a budget resolution in four years, and they have enjoyed less and less the constant ribbing for it that they have received from the GOP.

Murray’s budget faces major hurdles, the first of which is the composition of her panel. Democrats only have a 12-10 majority, which means that if all Republicans vote no, Murray can afford not even one defection. That means convincing Sens. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerOvernight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain Facebook under fire over Russian ads in election MORE (D-Va.), Tim KaineTimothy Michael KaineWeek ahead: Crunch time for defense bill’s cyber reforms | Equifax under scrutiny Insurer Anthem to cover bare ObamaCare counties in Virginia Senate votes down Paul's bid to revoke war authorizations MORE (D-Va.), Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Dems fear lasting damage from Clinton-Sanders fight MORE (I-Vt.) and Angus KingAngus Stanley KingSenate's defense authorization would set cyber doctrine Washington dysfunction is damaging national security Booker signs on to Sanders's 'Medicare-for-all' bill MORE (I-Maine) all to vote yes on the same measure. They are not men who see the world and policy in similar ways.

Sanders, a sharp critic of any suggestion that entitlement programs be cut, last week told The Hill that the budget talks have been “very hard.”

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Finance to hold hearing on ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (D-Ore.), another Budget panel member, said, “A Senate budget debate is never for the faint of heart, and this year is going to be especially difficult.”

Should Murray get her budget through committee, more stumbling blocks await on the floor.

Democratic senators from red states who face reelection battles next year will have to be courted. This group includes Sens. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBernie Sanders flexes power on single-payer ObamaCare architect supports single-payer system Trump has yet to travel west as president MORE (Mont.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska), Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (N.C.), Tim JohnsonTim JohnsonCourt ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Bank lobbyists counting down to Shelby’s exit Former GOP senator endorses Clinton after Orlando shooting MORE (S.D.), Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuCNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' Trump posts O'Keefe videos on Instagram MORE (La.) and Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.).

Other Democrats who could balk at the budget include Sens. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyGOP sees fresh opening with Dems’ single payer embrace Trump steps up courtship of Dems Trump having dinner with Schumer, Pelosi on Wednesday MORE (Ind.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampJustice Dept investigating Equifax stock sales: report Dem senator: Trump 'very serious' about infrastructure Trump steps up courtship of Dems MORE (N.D.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinGOP sees fresh opening with Dems’ single payer embrace Trump steps up courtship of Dems The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (W.Va.) and Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterFive things to know about Sanders’s single-payer plan Where Dems stand on Sanders's single-payer bill Overnight Regulation: DeVos ignites backlash with rewrite of campus sexual assault policy l EPA power plant rule decision likely this fall | Panel approves Trump financial regulator nominees MORE (Mont.).

Murray and her fellow Democratic leaders can afford only five defections. If Democrats don’t get 51 votes, senators’ pay will be suspended, as stipulated in a bill that became law last month.

But it is worth noting that Murray is on a roll. She helped expand the Democratic majority last year as head of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and later was rewarded with her Budget gavel.

Still, passing this bill might prove an even bigger challenge than tightening her party’s hold on the upper chamber.