Player of the Week: Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.)

Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerData confirm that marijuana decriminalization is long overdue Pollster: Kavanaugh will get Dem votes Democrats slam Trump for considering Putin’s ’absurd’ request to question Americans MORE has a lot on his plate this week.

The New York Democrat is trying to forge major compromises on two high-profile pieces of President Obama’s domestic agenda: immigration reform and gun control.

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Schumer and Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnThe real disease: Price transparency key to saving Medicare and lowering the debt Mr. President, let markets help save Medicare Pension insolvency crisis only grows as Congress sits on its hands MORE (R-Okla.) were close to a deal on background checks earlier this year, but they couldn’t agree on the details. Now, Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), who is up for reelection in 2016, is emerging as a possible GOP partner.

Schumer, who helped pass the 1994 assault weapons ban in the House, has long known that reinstating that ban is not going to pass during this Congress. But he has called background checks the “sweet spot” of gun-control efforts.

Meanwhile, the “Gang of Eight,” which includes Schumer, is close to an agreement on immigration reform. Schumer, the No. 3-ranked Senate Democrat, said bill language could emerge this week.

Passing both gun control and immigration reform will be extraordinarily difficult, but Schumer has gained the trust of key Republicans such as Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio: Crisis in Nicaragua could lead to civil war Release of Carter Page surveillance documents reignites debate Graham: Warrant for Carter Page surveillance was 'a bunch of garbage' MORE (Fla.) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainThe Memo: Summit fallout hits White House Graham: Biggest problem is Trump ‘believes meddling equals collusion’ Obama, Bush veterans dismiss Trump-Putin interpreter subpoena MORE (Ariz.).

Over the weekend, McCain criticized some of his fellow Republicans who are vowing to filibuster gun-control legislation, saying, “I don’t understand it. What are we afraid of?”

Schumer was instrumental in getting the AFL-CIO and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to reach a deal on an immigration plan for low-skilled workers, which had been a major obstacle to a deal.

Still, there is no agreement until all eight senators have signed off on bill language.

Like any dealmaker, Schumer has taken some friendly fire from his base. Immigration activists are worried that he and the other seven senators are focusing too much on border security.

Gun-control groups are concerned that gun legislation is being watered down to attract GOP support.

To have a successful 2013, Obama needs the Senate to act soon on gun-control and immigration legislation. That means he needs Schumer to broker deals that have so far been elusive.