Player of the week: Sen. Joe Lieberman

Sen. Joe Lieberman, the Connecticut Independent who has a penchant for attracting headlines, is expected to put the finishing touches on a long-awaited climate change bill with Sens. John KerryJohn KerrySenators who have felt McCain's wrath talk of their respect for him Dems see huge field emerging to take on Trump Budowsky: Dems need council of war MORE (D-Mass.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamBusiness pressure ramps up against Trump's Ex-Im nominee Senators who have felt McCain's wrath talk of their respect for him McCain absence adds to GOP agenda’s uncertainty MORE (R-S.C.). And on Monday, he issued subpoenas to the White House on the deadly shooting at Fort Hood in 2009.

It’s interesting that two of the three senators who are leading the climate change effort in the upper chamber backed Sen. John McCainJohn McCainManchin bashes GOP candidate for pushing McCain to resign McCain’s primary challenger asks him to step aside after diagnosis Sen. McCain goes on hike after cancer diagnosis MORE (R-Ariz.) for president in 2008. But it remains to be seen if McCain, who is close friends with Lieberman and Graham and considered running with Kerry as his vice presidential candidate in 2004, will back their bill.

McCain is in the midst of a challenging primary against former Rep. J.D. Hayworth (R-Ariz.) and has moved right since losing the presidential race.

Lieberman, meanwhile, is cautiously optimistic that he can garner 60 votes to pass what is expected to be much more centrist and narrower legislation than the climate bill that passed the House last summer and Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerTime is now to address infrastructure needs Tom Steyer testing waters for Calif. gubernatorial bid Another day, another dollar for retirement advice rip-offs MORE’s (D-Calif.) measure that cleared her committee last fall.

Still, Lieberman is facing a steep climb to pass such a controversial measure with a little more than six months before the midterm elections.
Kerry, Graham and Lieberman were expected to release a bill by now, but the formal introduction won’t come until next week. That means there will be plenty of lobbying throughout the week as the trio of senators tries to get the legislation ready for prime time.

Lieberman, chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, who is working with the White House on climate change, said he is tired of waiting for key information on Fort Hood.

Lieberman and his ranking member, Sen. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsGOP wrestles with soaring deductibles in healthcare bill Sunday shows preview: Scaramucci makes TV debut as new communication chief The GOP Wonder Women who saved healthcare for 22 million MORE (R-Maine), last fall said their probe of the rampage that killed 13 people would “require the prompt and full cooperation of the executive branch — cooperation that must start as soon as possible.”

Five months later, according to Collins and Lieberman, that cooperation has been insufficient.