First federal agency gets 'A' grade in IT report card

First federal agency gets 'A' grade in IT report card
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Federal agencies averaged a "B" grade in information technology procurement in their latest report cards, with one agency being the first to score an "A."

The fourth version of the Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA) scorecard dropped Tuesday morning, with the B average the same as in the last report, six months ago.

FITARA uses an evolving set of gradable criteria to evaluate progress in information technology investments. Grades come out twice a year and are meant to keep agencies focused on IT targets.  

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The criteria included issues of risk management, whether purchases could show incremental benefits and whether upgrading systems to the cloud had realized anticipated cost savings. 

In the latest report card, the United States Agency for International Development scored the first ever A-range grade — an A-plus. Commerce, Homeland Security, Housing and Urban Development, Justice, Veterans Affairs, the Environmental Protection Agency and the General Services Administration all scored in the B range. Defense received the only F. 

"When I meet with stakeholders in federal IT from government agencies and industry, I am constantly reminded why previous major IT reform efforts have fallen short of their potential — the lack of a robust implementation plan and congressional oversight," said Rep. Gerry ConnollyGerry ConnollyHow the New South became a swing region Three dead after violent clashes at white nationalist rally House Democrats call for transparency in Trump's deregulatory panels MORE (D-Va.), who co-authored the original FITARA legislation, at a hearing about the new report.

"Through countless hearings and briefings, close coordination with the Office of Management and Budget and [the Government Accountability Office], and our work on the FITARA scorecard, our subcommittees have committed to the successful implementation and oversight of FITARA."

In aggregate, the 24 graded agencies scored one A, seven B's, 10 C's, five D's and an F, only a slight change from the zero A's, eight B's, 10 C's, five D's and an F in the December issue of the report.