OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Senate GOP angry over Defense bill dispute

The Topline: The plan from defense lawmakers to quickly pass a Defense authorization bill in the House and Senate is running into resistance from Senate Republicans.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnell43 arrested in ObamaCare repeal protests at Capitol Four Senate conservatives say they oppose ObamaCare repeal bill The Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (R-Ky.) criticized Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDems see surge of new candidates Dems to grind Senate to a halt over ObamaCare repeal fight GOP fires opening attack on Dem reportedly running for Heller's Senate seat MORE (D-Nev.) for not bringing the Defense bill up this week and preventing additional amendments from being considered. 

ADVERTISEMENT
McConnell accused Reid of trying to jam the Pentagon policy bill through the upper chamber in order to duck a vote on Iran sanctions.

“This is a rather transparent attempt to prevent a vote on an enhanced Iran sanctions,” McConnell said. “So they’re trying to circumvent the Senate to pass major legislation, essentially without amendments.”

McConnell stopped short of saying he would try to block the bill, and so far only Sen. Tom CoburnTom Coburn'Path of least resistance' problematic for Congress Freedom Caucus saved Paul Ryan's job: GOP has promises to keep Don't be fooled: Carper and Norton don't fight for DC MORE (R-Okla.) has suggested he would do so over the amendments dispute.

But even the Republicans who most strongly support the $607 billion Defense bill say the anger from Republicans is warranted.

“No amendments is pretty unreasonable,” Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamThe Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Judiciary Committee to continue Russia probe after Mueller meeting Why does Paul Ryan want to punish American consumers? MORE (R-S.C.) told reporters.

Sen. John McCainJohn McCainThe Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Meghan McCain slams 'felon' Dinesh D'Souza over tweets mocking father's captivity White House launches ObamaCare repeal web page MORE (R-Ariz.), who said he wants to move forward on the bill, slammed Reid for waiting until the last minute to bring up the Defense bill when it passed in June.

“There are people who have objections because of the majority leader of the Senate, his mismanagement of the Senate that did not allow us to bring up the Defense authorization after it came out of the committee in June,” McCain said.

It’s still not clear whether the resistance from GOP senators will actually stop the bill from going forward when the Senate takes it up, likely next week.

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl LevinCarl LevinTrump's crush on foreign autocrats threatens democracy at home OPINION: Congress must press forward with its Russia investigation Democrats and Republicans share blame in rewriting the role of the Senate MORE (D-Mich.) and ranking member Sen. James InhofeJames InhofeMcCain strikes back as Trump’s chief critic Turbulence for Trump on air traffic control Parliamentarian threatens deadly blow to GOP healthcare bill MORE (R-Okla.) say the situation is not ideal, but argue it’s the only way to get a bill done this year.

They warn that there are dangerous consequences if the bill isn’t done by the end of the year, like the loss of combat pay for troops.

But in a sign of the GOP argument should they try to stop the bill, Graham said that issue could be resolved.

“There are things like bonuses and combat pay that can be retroactively applied,” Graham said. 

More optimism on the House side: Republican Armed Services leaders in the House say they don’t expect any problems on their side of the Capitol when it comes to passing the Defense bill.

Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-Texas), the committee’s vice chairman, said he expected the bill would get done in the House before the end of the week, when the lower chamber is expected to adjourn for the year.

“I think it’ll be filed, I think we’ll vote on it, I think it’ll pass,” Thornberry told reporters.

While there’s been talk of getting Iran sanctions into the bill on the Senate side, Thornberry said he didn’t expect that would be raised in the House, where the bill can be taken up without amendments under multiple parliamentary procedures.

“That is such a big issue, we probably ought to deal with it separately,” he said.

House aides say they expect the bill will get a vote later this week, either Thursday or Friday.

Karzai 'playing with fire' on postwar talks: Washington's top diplomat in Afghanistan told Congress that President Hamid Karzai is playing a dangerous game in stonewalling a postwar pact, reiterating the Obama administration remains willing to pull all forces out of the country next year. 

In ongoing negotiations with State Department and Pentagon officials, the Afghan leader continues to express "complete disinterest" in what size a possible U.S. postwar force would be, James Dobbins, U.S. special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan ambassador, told lawmakers on Tuesday. 

That disinterest, according to Dobbins, is part of a power play by the Karzai government to set the terms of the postwar deal, driven by the belief the United States cannot afford a complete withdrawal from Afghanistan. 

But Karzai "is playing with fire" should the the defiant Afghan president attempt to call Washington's bluff on a complete pull-out, known inside the White House as the "zero option," Dobbins told members of the Senate Foreign Relations panel. 

During the hearing, committee chief Sen. Robert MenendezRobert MenendezBipartisan group, Netflix actress back bill for American Latino Museum The Mideast-focused Senate letter we need to see Taiwan deserves to participate in United Nations MORE (D-N.J.) pressed Dobbins on whether after 12 years of war, the United States had hit a "breaking point" in Afghanistan where a zero option would make sense. 

"Is there a point where walking away" from Afghanistan would be better than pushing for a postwar deal? "I personally do not think so," Dobbins told Menendez. 

Afghanistan, Iran reach security pact: Afghan President Hamid Karzai has inked a security pact with Iran, setting the stage for long-term security, economic and political cooperation between Kabul and Tehran. 

The Afghan-Iran deal represents a "long-term friendship and cooperation pact" with Iran that "will be for long-term political, security, economic and cultural cooperation, regional peace," according to Karzai spokesman Aimal Faizi. 

The pact, however, will have no effect on ongoing postwar talks with Washington, a top U.S. diplomat told Congress. 

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani again blasted Afghanistan's pending deal with the United States. 

“We are concerned about tension arising out of the presence of foreign forces in the region, believing that all foreign forces should get out of the region and the task of guaranteeing Afghan security should be entrusted to the country’s people,” Rouhani told Iranian state-run news agency IRNA.

"At this point I would not attach a lot of importance to it," Ambassador James Dobbins, U.S. special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, told the Senate Foreign Relations panel.

On Tuesday, Dobbins told committee members Iran's opposition to a U.S. postwar force did not align with the rest of Afghanistan's regional partners. 

Outside of Tehran, "there is a quite a remarkable ... consensus" from regional powers for American troops to remain in Afghanistan after 2014, Dobbins said. That said, "I'm not getting to excited about" the Afghan-Iran pact, he added. 

 

In Case You Missed it: 

— McConnell: Reid ducking Iran sanctions vote

— Defense lawmakers look to defuse Pentagon spending bill 

— Al Qaeda in Syria kill two top rebel commanders 

— US drones take out three terror suspects in Yemen

 

Please send tips and comments to Jeremy Herb, jherb@thehill.com, and Carlo Muñoz, cmunoz@thehill.com.

Follow us on Twitter: @DEFCONHill, @JHerbTheHill, @CMunozTheHill

You can sign up to receive this overnight update via email on The Hill’s homepage