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Lawmakers worried about terrorists getting Libyan missiles

The Senate on Wednesday urged the Obama administration to work harder at keeping Libyan missiles out of terrorists' hands.

The upper chamber approved an amendment to the 2012 Pentagon policy bill that would mandate the administration conduct "an urgent" intelligence assessment about some 20,000 Libyan portable missile systems, according to a summary of the amendment.

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Since the regime of Moammar Gadhafi was ousted, lawmakers and security experts have voiced concerns about terrorist groups nabbing them.
 
The amendment also requires the White House to put in place a new plan to "mitigate this threat," states the summary.

The amendment was crafted by Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand FCC to officially rescind net neutrality rules on Thursday MORE (R-Maine), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOvernight Defense: VA chief won't resign | Dem wants probe into VA hacking claim | Trump official denies plan for 'bloody nose' N. Korea strike | General '100 percent' confident in US missile defense Trump official denies US planning 'bloody nose' strike on North Korea House Oversight Committee opens probe into sexual abuse of gymnasts MORE (D-N.H.) and Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyDems hit stock buybacks in tax law fight Dem senator warns Mueller against issuing Russia report near 2018 election Dem praises gay US Olympian who feuded with Pence MORE (D-Penn.).

“Locating and securing these weapons is crucial to protecting our airways as we address concerning reports of unsecured and looted stockpiles of tens-of-thousands of shoulder-fired missiles in Libya," Shaheen said in a statement. "If these weapons fall into the wrong hands, they pose a serious threat to Americans who rely on air travel, our deployed forces abroad, and civil aviation worldwide."