Clapper: Most of data stolen by Snowden not on domestic programs

Intelligence officials say only a very small percent of information stolen by former National Security Agency contract Edward Snowden had to do with telephone metadata and internet data collection. 

"I would say that probably less than 10 percent has to do with domestic surveillance. It's a ballpark," said Director of National Intelligence James Clapper at a House Intelligence Committee hearing on Tuesday.

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Beginning last June, through a series of leaks to the news media, Snowden revealed NSA surveillance programs that collected information on U.S. citizens' telephone calls and internet communication. 

"The vast majority of what is potentially at risk here is -- bears on many other topics besides telephone metadata," said Clapper. 

"And so what he accessed, what he scraped, what he potentially made off with is -- transcends that. So it's -- it's quite serious," he said. 

Intelligence officials testifying at the hearing said they have to assume Snowden stole everything he could get his hands on -- an estimated 1.7 million documents -- including information that will put troops' lives at risk around the world. 

"I believe that we will face problems with the IED threat because of these leaks, whether it's in Afghanistan, or on some future battlefield, yes," said Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency Michael Flynn.  

The leaks have caused the Defense Department to review all its actions, events, and exercises around the world, Flynn said.  

Some of the information may be in the hands of Russian intelligence services, intelligence officials said. 

"It's beyond belief to me that they wouldn't be taking advantage of the opportunity both to exploit and to control Snowden," said Clapper.