Lawmakers reject 'legal end' to Iraq war

The House Appropriations Committee on Tuesday batted down two pieces of legislation on authorizations for use of military force (AUMF), including one that tried to end the authority in Iraq years after the last U.S. troops returned.

Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeThe nearly 60 Dems who voted for impeachment Government study shows lack of diversity in tech House votes on US involvement in Yemen MORE (D-Calif.) offered the measures as amendments to $491 billion defense spending bill for fiscal 2015.

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The first sought to prohibit funds for the authorization for the AUMF in Iraq that lawmakers approved in 2002. Lee argued that it was time to bring the war in Iraq to “an official, legal end.”

Rep. Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenConservative lawmakers met to discuss GOP chairman’s ouster Overnight Finance: GOP delays work on funding bill amid conservative demands | Senate panel approves Fed nominee Powell | Dodd-Frank rollback advances | WH disputes report Mueller subpoenaed Trump bank records Overnight Finance: House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama | GOP leaders to consider Dec. 30 spending bill | Justices skeptical of ban on sports betting | Mulvaney won't fire official who sued him MORE (R-N.J), chair of the panel’s Defense subcommittee, opposed the amendment, noting that U.S. troops left in 2011. He added that there were no funds in spending plan related to Iraq.

The amendment was defeated 31-17.

The second, also offered by Lee, would have required the administration to submit reports to Congress on activities carried out under the AUMF against those responsible for the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The California Democrat said the authorization was no longer necessary, 13 years later.

Frelinghuysen again rose in opposition, saying such reports could contain claissfied information and provide U.S. enemies a “road map” into military and intelligence activities.

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHouse Democrat slams Donald Trump Jr. for ‘serious case of amnesia’ after testimony Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father Erik Prince says meeting with Russian banker unrelated to Trump campaign MORE (D-Calif.), who sought to sunset the AUMF in the 2015 authorization bill last month, said the authority was being used in ways “never foreseen in the past.”

That amendment was defeated as well, 27-21.