WH can’t confirm ISIS plot to attack subways

The United States has not confirmed Iraqi intelligence suggesting the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is plotting to use foreign fighters to attack subways New York City and Paris, the White House said Thursday.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi told journalists at the United Nations General Assembly in New York that he had received reports from Baghdad "that there were arrests of a few elements, and there were networks from inside Iraq to have attacks ... on metros of Paris and U.S." 

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"They are not Iraqis. Some of them are French, some of them are Americans. But they are in Iraq," al-Abadi added. He said he was not sure if the attacks were imminent and did not believe they had been thwarted.

National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said the U.S. could not confirm the plot, but the Obama administration was "obviously very focused on the issue of foreign fighters."

"We’ve seen the reports of Prime Minister Abadi’s comments. We have not confirmed such a plot and would have to review any information from our Iraqi partners before making further determinations," Hayden said. "We take any threat seriously and always work to corroborate information we receive from our partners."

Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.), a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, said he also was unaware of an imminent threat.

"I have been aware that there are plots that ISIS is planning overseas against other countries, quite honestly, I have not been advised of this — and I have been checking this out — I don't believe that the U.S. government has been advised of an imminent plot," King told CBS News

On Wednesday, President Obama chaired a meeting of the United Nations Security Council, where the panel unanimously voted to adopt a resolution demanding countries toughen their laws and regulations to prevent the flow of foreign fighters to terror groups.

He said that more than 15,000 foreign fighters from more than 80 nations had traveled to Syria in recent years, and those terrorists "exacerbate conflicts" and pose an immediate threat to other nations.

"Around the world, foreign terrorist fighters have been arrested, plots have been disrupted and lives have been saved," Obama said.

Western leaders have expressed concern the foreign fighters could travel back to their home countries to carry out terror attacks.

The Security Council resolution will call on nations to adopt new laws and regulations to prosecute and penalize those affiliated with terror groups, prevent the entry or transit of individuals linked to terrorism, and target the willful provision of funds to terror groups.

The Treasury Department also announced sanctions on 11 individuals and one Indonesian charity organization believed to have helped facilitate the movement of foreign fighters to terrorist groups.