GOP senators press resolution for Benghazi Select Committee

Three Republican senators are introducing a resolution to establish a Select Committee on the attack in Benghazi, Libya, which they say is the only way for the truth about what happened to emerge.

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSenate's defense authorization would set cyber doctrine Senate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions MORE (R-Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTop Louisiana health official rips Cassidy over ObamaCare repeal bill Senate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions MORE (R-S.C.) and Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteStale, misguided, divisive: minimum wage can't win elections Trump voter fraud commission sets first meeting outside DC RNC chair warns: Republicans who refused to back Trump offer 'cautionary tale' MORE (R-N.H.) said at a press conference Wednesday that the attack on the U.S. Consulate that killed U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans cut across the jurisdictions of the Armed Services, Intelligence and Foreign Relations committees, and that a Select Committee was necessary to talk to administration officials in all three agencies.

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That included former CIA Director David Petraeus, who has agreed to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee in a closed session on Benghazi.

“I’d like to ask General Petraeus some questions,” Graham said.

McCain said that Petraeus would be a “very important witness for a Select Committee.”

The three senators, who all sit on the Armed Services Committee, first raised the idea of a Select Committee earlier this month, and are officially introducing a resolution for its formation Wednesday.



Graham suggested there was a precedent for establishing such a committee, comparing it to past committees established for Watergate and Iran-Contra.


The senators said that the administration’s own internal examination of the Benghazi incident was not sufficient.

McCain said that “it’s very clear” there will be some resistance to the idea.

“The party in power never likes to have a Select Committee, but I’m hopeful the American people will demand it,” he said.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThe Memo: Trump pulls off a stone-cold stunner The Memo: Ending DACA a risky move for Trump Manchin pressed from both sides in reelection fight MORE (D-Nev.) said Wednesday he did not support forming a Select Committee, according to reports.

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl LevinCarl LevinPresident Trump, listen to candidate Trump and keep Volcker Rule Republicans can learn from John McCain’s heroism Trump and GOP wise to keep tax reform and infrastructure separate MORE (D-Mich.) was also cool on the idea, saying he wanted to first see what the committees themselves discovered before deciding if a Select Committee was needed.

In addition to Petraeus, the senators said Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain MORE would also be likely witnesses.