GOP senators press resolution for Benghazi Select Committee

Three Republican senators are introducing a resolution to establish a Select Committee on the attack in Benghazi, Libya, which they say is the only way for the truth about what happened to emerge.

Sens. John McCainJohn McCainIs Georgia turning blue? High anxiety for GOP Trump: 'Very disappointed' GOP senator dropped support MORE (R-Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamHigh anxiety for GOP NYC mayor: Trump sounds like ‘a third-world dictator’ Five takeaways from final debate MORE (R-S.C.) and Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteHigh anxiety for GOP Trump: 'Very disappointed' GOP senator dropped support NH poll: Dem challenger pulls ahead of Ayotte MORE (R-N.H.) said at a press conference Wednesday that the attack on the U.S. Consulate that killed U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans cut across the jurisdictions of the Armed Services, Intelligence and Foreign Relations committees, and that a Select Committee was necessary to talk to administration officials in all three agencies.

That included former CIA Director David Petraeus, who has agreed to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee in a closed session on Benghazi.

“I’d like to ask General Petraeus some questions,” Graham said.

McCain said that Petraeus would be a “very important witness for a Select Committee.”

The three senators, who all sit on the Armed Services Committee, first raised the idea of a Select Committee earlier this month, and are officially introducing a resolution for its formation Wednesday.

Graham suggested there was a precedent for establishing such a committee, comparing it to past committees established for Watergate and Iran-Contra.

The senators said that the administration’s own internal examination of the Benghazi incident was not sufficient.

McCain said that “it’s very clear” there will be some resistance to the idea.

“The party in power never likes to have a Select Committee, but I’m hopeful the American people will demand it,” he said.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidPelosi blasts GOP leaders for silence on Trump Latinos build a wall between Trump and White House in new ad The true (and incredible) story of Hill staffers on the industry payroll MORE (D-Nev.) said Wednesday he did not support forming a Select Committee, according to reports.

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl LevinCarl LevinThe Fed and a return to banking simplicity What Our presidential candidates can learn from Elmo Zumwalt Will there be a 50-50 Senate next year? MORE (D-Mich.) was also cool on the idea, saying he wanted to first see what the committees themselves discovered before deciding if a Select Committee was needed.

In addition to Petraeus, the senators said Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonToomey: 'No reason' Trump supporters shouldn't back me WATCH LIVE: Trump delivers 'first 100 days' speech in Gettysburg Dylan's 'Jokerman' a metaphor for Election 2016 and more MORE would also be likely witnesses.