OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Senate starts work on defense bill

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinHow House Republicans scrambled the Russia probe Congress dangerously wields its oversight power in Russia probe The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate MORE (D-Mich.) and ranking member Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMulvaney aims to cement CFPB legacy by ensuring successor's confirmation Trump mocks McCain at Nevada rally Don’t disrespect McCain by torpedoing his clean National Defense Authorization Act MORE (R-Ariz.) are managing the bill and its numerous amendments, and they warned of long hours on the wide-ranging bill in the coming days.

“We’re going to have amendments and debate and if that requires long hours, then I think our colleagues should be prepared to do that,” McCain said Wednesday. “We’re not here to work three-day work weeks.”

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One of the most contentious amendments was tackled early, as the Senate voted on an amendment from Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Democratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups MORE (D-Colo.) on biofuels and the military.

Udall’s amendment overturned an amendment that had passed in committee restricting the military from purchasing biofuels that cost more than petroleum. The Senate passed Udall’s amendment 62-37.

A similar measure that restricts the military purchasing biofuels still remains in the House-passed defense authorization bills, making it one of the key issues that will need to be resolved in conference committee.

Embassy security amendment also adopted: The Senate also passed several amendments by voice-vote Wednesday, including one from McCain that would place more Marines at U.S. embassies and consulates around the world.

McCain said the amendment was important in the wake of the attack on the U.S. facility in Benghazi, Libya, where four Americans were killed, including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens.

The Senate also moved several other amendments on the defense bill by voice vote Wednesday afternoon, including one from Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) that would discharge those found guilty of sexual violence in the military, and another from Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges —Dems, health groups demand immigrant children be quickly reunited with families White House releases sweeping proposal to reorganize government Democrats protest Trump's immigration policy from Senate floor MORE (D-Wash.) to improve mental health and suicide services the Pentagon provides.

US shutters Afghan base named after Tillman: American troops have closed the forward operating base in eastern Afghanistan named after slain Army Ranger and former NFL star Pat Tillman.

The Hill’s Carlo Muñoz reports from Paktika, Afghanistan, that Army units based in Forward Operating base Orgun-E near the Afghan-Pakistan border shuttered the base that bore Tillman’s name over Thanksgiving.

“It's a soccer field ... kids are already playing on it,” one Army officer said.

The closure is a sign of the U.S. plans to withdraw most U.S. troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014, when NATO will transfer security control to the Afghans.

Read more about the end of the base named for Tillman here.

Rice meetings with GOP continue: U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice continued to meet with senators as she is considered on the short list to be nominated by President Obama as the next secretary of State.

On Wednesday, Rice met with Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate Gang of Four to meet next week on immigration Republicans agree — it’s only a matter of time for Scott Pruitt Skyrocketing insulin prices provoke new outrage MORE (R-Maine) and Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCorker: 'I think there's a jailbreak brewing' in opposition to Trump tariffs GOP scrambles to regain fiscal credibility with House budget On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Senators hammers Ross on Trump tariffs | EU levies tariffs on US goods | Senate rejects Trump plan to claw back spending MORE (R-Tenn.), who is set to become the next ranking member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which would handle Rice’s confirmation should she be chosen.

The two Republican senators had different reactions one day after McCain and Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate panel advances three spending bills Trump says he will sign executive order to end family separations Trump backs narrow bill halting family separations: official MORE (R-S.C.) and Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteHeitkamp ad highlights record as Senate race heats up Ernst, Fischer to square off for leadership post The Hill's Morning Report: Koch Network re-evaluating midterm strategy amid frustrations with GOP MORE (R-N.H.) said they were unsatisfied with Rice’s answers.

Collins said she continued to be “troubled” by the fact that “the UN ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election.”

Corker, however, took a more diplomatic route, declining to criticize Rice after he met with her.

“I know that at some point I may play a semi-important role in who the next secretary of State may be,” Corker told reporters. “Whoever the president nominates, I certainly plan to sit down and give a full hearing to, as I’ve said from Day One, regardless of who that nominee is.”


IN CASE YOU MISSED IT:

— Report: Hagel vetted for Cabinet posts

— Senate passes sexual violence, mental health amendments

— Biofuel investments restored in defense bill

— Reid avoids filibuster to start defense bill debate


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