Iraqi special visa program expires

The House had included a one-year extension of the Iraqi visas in the stopgap funding measures that it passed on Saturday and Monday, but those were rejected by the Senate.

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Late Monday evening, with just minutes to go before the government shutdown, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidAmendments fuel resentments within Senate GOP Donald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing Danny Tarkanian wins Nevada GOP congressional primary MORE (D-Nev.) passed a three-month extension in a standalone bill by unanimous consent.

House GOP leaders have not yet indicated whether they will take up the standalone bill to extend the visas for three months. A spokesman for House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate Race for Republican Speaker rare chance to unify party for election Scalise allies upset over Ryan blindside on McCarthy endorsement MORE (R-Va.) did not respond to a request for comment.

The program to give Iraqis who helped the U.S. government Special Immigrant Visas (SIV) began in 2007, authorizing 5,000 visas annually. A similar program for Afghans who helped the U.S. allows for 1,500 visas per year and has already been extended through 2014.

Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDem senator: If Nielsen doesn't reunite families, 'she should resign' America will not forget about Pastor Andrew Brunson Shaheen sidelined after skin surgery MORE (D-N.H.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMulvaney aims to cement CFPB legacy by ensuring successor's confirmation Trump mocks McCain at Nevada rally Don’t disrespect McCain by torpedoing his clean National Defense Authorization Act MORE (R-Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate panel advances three spending bills Trump says he will sign executive order to end family separations Trump backs narrow bill halting family separations: official MORE (R-S.C.) and Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyOvernight Defense: Defense spending bill amendments target hot-button issues | Space Force already facing hurdles | Senators voice 'deep' concerns at using military lawyers on immigration cases Senators 'deeply troubled' military lawyers being used for immigration cases Overnight Energy: EPA declines to write new rule for toxic spills | Senate blocks move to stop Obama water rule | EPA bought 'tactical' pants and polos MORE (D-Vt.) had also tried last week to include a yearlong extension in the Senate’s continuing resolution (CR) as an amendment, but opted to push for a stand-alone bill when it became clear the CR wasn’t a feasible route.

The Senate had also included the visa extension in its immigration bill, which the House has not taken up.

Lawmakers argue that killing the visa program would break a promise made to Iraqis who have risked their lives to help the U.S. military.

 “We made a promise to thousands of Iraqi civilians who risked their lives helping our country during a time of war and now we must honor our commitment,” Shaheen said last week.

"When you talk to people I don't think anybody would oppose this," said Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.), who has pushed the bill in the House. "When somebody puts their life on the line for our country, they ought to be repaid."