McCain pledges 'rigorous oversight' after Air Force failure to report Texas gunman's conviction

McCain pledges 'rigorous oversight' after Air Force failure to report Texas gunman's conviction
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Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump informally offered Cohn CIA job before changing his mind: report Schiff: I thought more Republicans would speak out against Trump Trump presses GOP to change Senate rules MORE (R-Ariz.) is promising “rigorous oversight” after the Air Force revealed it did not add the suspect in a deadly Texas church shooting to a database that would have banned him from buying a gun.

“The Senate Armed Services Committee will conduct rigorous oversight of the department's investigation into the circumstances that led to this failure,” McCain, the committee's chairman, said in a statement. “It's critical that each of the military services take the steps necessary to ensure that similar mistakes have not occurred and will not occur in the future.”

McCain added that his “thoughts and prayers remain with the congregation in Sutherland Springs, Texas—especially the families of the victims of this horrific shooting.”

On Sunday, a gunman opened fire at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, killing 26 people.

Authorities have identified the gunman as Devin Kelley, 26, who officials said died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Kelley received a “bad conduct” discharge from the Air Force in 2014 after being convicted in court-martial of domestic violence.

The domestic violence conviction should have precluded him from buying a gun under federal law. But Air Force officials said Monday that the Holloman Air Force Base Office of Special Investigation did not enter his conviction into the National Criminal Information Center database.

The Air Force said Secretary Heather Wilson and Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein has directed the service's inspector general to work with its Pentagon counterpart to review the Kelley case and relevant policies and procedures.

Some members of the Senate Armed Services Committee have also called for a wider review of each military branch’s criminal cases to make sure there have been no lapses similar to Kelley.

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