Senate backers of 11th-hour push on renewable power mandate predict victory

A bipartisan group of senators leading a revived effort for Senate approval of a renewable power mandate this year predicted victory Tuesday.

“The beauty of this is it’s not cap-and-trade,” Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kan.) told reporters. “It’s a responsible — it’s a bipartisan — approach.”

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Brownback stood alongside Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairman Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) and others at a media event introducing a renewable electricity standard (RES) that, aside from a few technical changes, echoes a mandate Bingaman’s panel approved as part of a larger energy strategy last year.

It would require electricity companies to produce 15 percent of their electricity from wind, solar, geothermal and a list of other green sources by 2021. A quarter of that mandate could be met through energy efficiency activities, also echoing last year’s version on Bingaman’s panel.

The plan is to gain enough support to convince Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems search for winning playbook Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response The Memo: Immigration battle tests activists’ muscle MORE (D-Nev.) to move it during a post-election lame-duck session. “We are not in a position to urge that yet,” Bingaman said. He said they need a little more time to “demonstrate the support that many of us think is there.”

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuProject Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' MORE (D-La.) said Tuesday she would not vote for a renewable electricity standard (RES) unless offshore oil-and-gas drilling is allowed to move forward.

The mandate was considered all-but-dead before a recent marketing and advocacy blitz by environmentalists, renewable energy groups and other supporters. Reid recently reversed course and said the measure has a chance to come up during a lame-duck session.

Brownback was one of only three Republicans on the Energy and Natural Resources panel — along with then-ranking member Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSessions torched by lawmakers for marijuana move Calif. Republican attacks Sessions over marijuana policy Trump's executive order on minerals will boost national defense MORE (Alaska) and Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerSenate campaign fundraising reports roll in Congress should take the lead on reworking a successful Iran deal North Korea tensions ease ahead of Winter Olympics MORE (Tenn.) — who supported the energy package that included the RES last year. Corker Tuesday said he will not support the RES by itself and Murkowski’s spokesman has said she is unlikely to do so either.

The RES “was one of the pieces that I disliked the most,” Corker told The Hill. “To bring it up on its own would not be a good plan in my opinion and it is certainly not something I could support.” He said a standard should give credit to existing nuclear power and hydroelectric generation.


Brownback is one of three Republicans – along with Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats search for 51st net neutrality vote Overnight Tech: States sue FCC over net neutrality repeal | Senate Dems reach 50 votes on measure to override repeal | Dems press Apple on phone slowdowns, kids' health | New Android malware found Overnight Regulation: Dems claim 50 votes in Senate to block net neutrality repeal | Consumer bureau takes first step to revising payday lending rule | Trump wants to loosen rules on bank loans | Pentagon, FDA to speed up military drug approvals MORE of Maine and John Ensign of Nevada – who are cosponsoring the stand-alone bill so far. Nevada – home state to Reid – has strong solar and geothermal production.

Reid has said an RES may be considered as part of a lame-duck session. He is not yet cosponsoring the bill introduced Tuesday. Other original cosponsors are Democrats Byron Dorgan (N.D.), Mark UdallMark Emery UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (Colo.), Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallCongress has been broken by the special interests – here’s how we fix it Senate GOP seeks to change rules for Trump picks Dems celebrate Jones victory in Alabama race MORE (N.M.) and Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellSenate Finance Dems want more transparency on trade from Trump Overnight Energy: Senate close to approving Arctic drilling | EPA cancels controversial media tracking contract | Trump officials sound alarm on mineral imports Lawmakers introduce bipartisan AI legislation MORE (Wash.).

Brownback said he is working to attract more Republican support. That may be contingent on whether Reid makes a move to “fill up the tree” and not allow any amendments to be offered to the measure.

Sen. Charles GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGOP senators eager for Romney to join them Five hurdles to a big DACA and border deal Grand jury indicts Maryland executive in Uranium One deal: report MORE (R-Iowa) Tuesday said he would support an RES but only if amendments are allowed to be offered.

"If [Reid] is going to fill the tree then I am not going to vote for cloture," Grassley said.

Brownback’s support for the RES without amendments being allowed depends on whether Reid “loads it with anything else,” he said. “People can’t get cute with this,” he said. 

Ben Geman contributed to this article.

This post initially incorrectly identified Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOvernight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector Pawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota Nielsen says 'possible' Trump used vulgar language in meeting MORE (D-Minn.) as an original co-sponsor of the new legislation. She has her own RES bill.