Senate climate drama to unfold in three acts

Leadership will meet Monday to determine the floor schedule for the bill, including when and in what order votes on two other climate amendments will occur.

The first, offered by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGiuliani: White House wants briefing on classified meeting over Russia probe GOP senators introduce Trump's plan to claw back billion in spending The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Trump now says Korea summit could still happen June 12 MORE (R-Ky.), would permanently block the agency from regulating greenhouse gas emissions.

The amendment is based on legislation offered by Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeFive takeaways on the canceled Trump summit with Kim Senate panel unanimously approves water infrastructure bill Defense bill moves forward with lawmakers thinking about McCain MORE (R-Okla.). Inhofe’s bill has 43 co-sponsors, including Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Finance: House sends Dodd-Frank rollbacks to Trump | What's in the bill | Trump says there is 'no deal' to help ZTE | Panel approves bill to toughen foreign investment reviews House votes to ease regulation of banks, sending bill to Trump Senators demand answers on Trump’s ZTE deal MORE (D-W.Va.).

The bill has passed a House committee earlier this month and is expected to come up for a vote on the House floor in the coming weeks.

A second amendment, offered by Sen. Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (D-W.Va.), would delay EPA’s climate regulations by two years.

Votes on the amendments could come as early as Tuesday, the aide said.

Interest groups scrambled this week to put pressure on lawmakers ahead of the vote.

The American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity, for example, has been running radio ads in several states in an attempt to pressure centrist Democrats to vote for the McConnell amendment.