OVERNIGHT ENERGY: House on cusp of blocking EPA, but Senate says no

Look for the issue to pop up on the campaign trail, where Republicans will likely hammer red-state Democrats.

“Unless this issue moves into an appropriations context, the votes today have likely become a 2012 campaign ad,” a refining industry lobbyist told E2.

The Senate rejected the GOP plan and several Democratic alternatives to limit or delay EPA while leaving its authority intact.

But supporters floated an argument after the Senate action that the sum of the amendment votes shows an appetite to limit EPA. See below for links to E2’s coverage of the battle Wednesday.

NEWS BITES:

Breaking down the Senate EPA votes

While a series of amendments to block or limit EPA climate regulations failed in the Senate Wednesday, they all gained some support from Democrats.

Republicans quickly pointed to the Democrats' support to argue that there is broad Senate backing for reining in EPA. But the GOP fell short of their goal on the most important climate vote of the day.

An amendment offered by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPolitical figures pay tribute to Charles Krauthammer Charles Krauthammer dies at the age of 68 Overnight Energy: EPA declines to write new rule for toxic spills | Senate blocks move to stop Obama water rule | EPA bought 'tactical' pants and polos MORE (R-Ky.) — and based on legislation introduced by Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Trump caves under immense pressure — what now? Inhofe: Pruitt got 'wake-up call' after showing 'questionable judgment' GOP senators introduce bill to prevent family separations at border MORE (R-Okla.) — to permanently kill EPA climate rules failed to get a majority of senators behind it. The Senate rejected the measure in a 50-50 vote.

The amendment needed 60 votes to pass. While Republicans never expected to reach that threshold, many were confident that they would get more than 50 senators to support the amendment.

Republicans vowed Wednesday to try and bring up their proposal again.

Here's a quick rundown of which Democrats supported the amendments:

Sens. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusClients’ Cohen ties become PR liability Green Party puts Dem seat at risk in Montana Business groups worried about Trump's China tariffs plan MORE (Mont.), Kay HaganKay Ruthven Hagan2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Politics is purple in North Carolina MORE (N.C.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharDem senators introduce bill to ban controversial voter purges Democrats protest Trump's immigration policy from Senate floor The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — GOP lawmakers race to find an immigration fix MORE (Minn.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichFormer Alaska senator jumps into governor race Overnight Energy: Trump directs Perry to stop coal plant closures | EPA spent ,560 on customized pens | EPA viewed postcard to Pruitt as a threat Perez creates advisory team for DNC transition MORE (Alaska), Tim JohnsonTimothy (Tim) Peter JohnsonSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Court ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Bank lobbyists counting down to Shelby’s exit MORE (S.D.), Kent Conrad (N.D.) and Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinHow House Republicans scrambled the Russia probe Congress dangerously wields its oversight power in Russia probe The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate MORE (Mich.) voted for the Baucus amendment.

Sens. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowModerates need to hold firm against radical right on Farm Bill New Kid Rock film explores political divide Congress must work with, not against, tribal communities in crafting Farm Bill MORE (Mich.), Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownDem senators introduce bill to ban controversial voter purges The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — GOP lawmakers race to find an immigration fix Warren to put hold on Trump consumer bureau nominee MORE (Ohio), Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyAction by Congress is needed to help victims of domestic violence Poll: Casey holds double-digit lead over Barletta in Pa. Senate race Ivanka Trump to press Senate on vocational training bill MORE (Penn.), Kent Conrad (N.D.), Tim Johnson (S.D.), Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.) voted for the Stabenow amendment.

Neither the Baucus nor the Stabenow amendments — which would have placed various limits on EPA rules while leaving the agency's regulatory power intact — got any GOP support.

Sens. Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (W.Va.), Kent Conrad (N.D.), Tim Johnson (S.D.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuLandrieu dynasty faces a pause in Louisiana Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Project Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns MORE (La.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Trump caves under immense pressure — what now? Election Countdown: Family separation policy may haunt GOP in November | Why Republican candidates are bracing for surprises | House Dems rake in record May haul | 'Dumpster fire' ad goes viral Manchin up 9 points over GOP challenger in W.Va. Senate race MORE (W.Va.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillConservative group calls for ethics probe into McCaskill’s use of private plane Senate moderates hunt for compromise on family separation bill Election Countdown: Family separation policy may haunt GOP in November | Why Republican candidates are bracing for surprises | House Dems rake in record May haul | 'Dumpster fire' ad goes viral MORE (Mo.), Ben Nelson (Neb.), Mark Pryor (Ark.) and Jim Webb (Va.) voted for the Rockefeller amendment, along with three Republicans: Sens. Scott Brown (Mass.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate Gang of Four to meet next week on immigration Republicans agree — it’s only a matter of time for Scott Pruitt Skyrocketing insulin prices provoke new outrage MORE (Maine) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate panel advances three spending bills Trump says he will sign executive order to end family separations Trump backs narrow bill halting family separations: official MORE (S.C.).

The Rockefeller amendment would block EPA climate rules for two years.

Meanwhile, four Democrats supported McConnell's amendment to permanently prevent the EPA from regulating greenhouse gas emissions. They include Sens. Mary Landrieu (La.), Joe Manchin (W.Va.), Mark Pryor (Ark.) and Ben Nelson (Neb.). One Republican, Sen. Susan Collins (Maine), voted against the amendment.

House Dem defends Koch Industries

Rep. Dan Boren (D-Okla.), one of three House co-sponsors of the Republican bill to block EPA climate regulations, defended Koch Industries Wednesday on the House floor, noting that a subsidiary of the company, Georgia Pacific, has a facility in his district.

"I’m proud of the work Koch Industries brings to my district and its record of environmental stewardship," Boren said.

Boren added that he wants to make sure "Koch can continue to invest in Oklahoma."

His comments came a day after Rep. Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyLawmakers, media serve up laughs at annual 'Will on the Hill' Overnight Energy: Trump praises Pruitt for doing 'great job' | Lawmakers want criminal probe of Pruitt | Heckler brings lotion bottle to Pruitt speech Lawmakers call for criminal investigation into EPA chief MORE (D-Va.) offered an amendment to the Republican bill to block EPA climate rules that would change the title of the bill to the "Koch Brothers Appreciation Act."

The billionaire Koch Brothers, who run Koch Industries, have become a major target of environmentalists' scorn, having contributed to a series of Republican causes.

Lawmakers introduce natural-gas vehicles bill

Reps. John Sullivan (R-Okla.), Dan Boren (D-Okla.), John Larson (D-Conn.) and Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyLawmakers, businesses await guidance on tax law On The Money: Trump imposes B in tariffs on China | China blasts 'fickle' Trump, promises payback | Trump to name consumer bureau director next week Trump announces tariffs on billion in Chinese goods MORE (R-Texas) introduced a bill Wednesday that would offer tax incentives to encourage the development of natural-gas vehicles.

“Natural gas is a cleaner, cheaper, more abundant alternative to foreign oil, and it is in both our economic and national security interest to use the vast reserves we have right here in our own backyard as the bridge fuel towards energy security,” Sullivan said in a statement.

The bill comes after President Obama called for policies to encourage the development of natural-gas vehicles.


ON TAP THURSDAY:

Here are a few highlights from the energy-related events around town ...

Biofuels in focus:
The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing to review Energy Department programs to boost biofuels and related infrastructure.

They’ll discuss Sen. Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinDem Senator open to bid from the left in 2020 Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Trump should require federal contractors to follow the law MORE’s (D-Iowa) bill to boost ethanol by requiring increased manufacture of vehicles that can run on high ethanol blends, providing new federal grants for ethanol pumps, and several other measures to boost availability of biofuels.

House panel review economic effects of EPA rules: A panel of the House Energy and Commerce Committee will review legislation that would require new interagency analysis of certain EPA rules “in an effort to better understand how these policies are impacting America’s global economic competitiveness, electricity and fuel prices, employment, and reliability of electricity supply,” according to a GOP memo on the hearing.

The bill also calls for “analysis of the cumulative impacts of EPA’s rules on consumers; small businesses; state, local and tribal governments; labor markets; and agriculture.”


IN CASE YOU MISSED IT…

Here’s a quick round-up of Wednesday’s E2 stories:

— Senate Republicans called on Obama to review the administration’s drilling policies

— A House Democrat said climate change is a bigger health threat than AIDS

— Sens. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallOvernight Energy: Spending bill targets Pruitt | Ryan not paying 'close attention' to Pruitt controversies | Yellowstone park chief learned of dismissal through press release Senate committee targets Pruitt scandals in spending bill Overnight Energy: DNC to reject fossil fuel donations | Regulators see no security risk in coal plant closures | Senate committee rejects Trump EPA, Interior budgets MORE (D-N.M.) and Mark UdallMark Emery UdallSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Democratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups MORE (D-Colo.) introduced a renewable electricity standard

— Some House Democrats voiced support for a bill to block EPA climate regulations

— Obama called for bridging divides on energy policy


Please send tips and comments to Ben Geman, ben.geman@thehill.com, and Andrew Restuccia, arestuccia@thehill.com.

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This post was updated at 9:08 a.m. on Thursday.