Senate Dems use GOP ethanol votes to push for tax revenues in deficit deal

Several Senate Democrats are using GOP support for killing ethanol subsidies as a political weapon against Republican leaders’ resistance to including increased tax revenues in a broad deficit-cutting deal.

Thirty-four Senate Republicans — including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellYou just can't keep good health policy down Trump threatens to veto omnibus over lack of wall funding, DACA fix Democrats desperate for a win hail spending bill MORE (R-Ky.) — this month voted to quickly end the multibillion-dollar ethanol blenders’ credit, albeit as part of economic development legislation that was subsequently derailed.

Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerFox News host Watters says spending bill was 'huge defeat' for Trump Amtrak to rename Rochester station after Louise Slaughter Conscience protections for health-care providers should be standard MORE (D-N.Y.), a top strategist for Senate Democrats, on Wednesday said this should open the door for ending tax breaks as part of the high-stakes deal that the White House and lawmakers are negotiating around raising the debt ceiling.

“It makes no sense for Leader McConnell to, on the one hand, say that he agrees that ethanol subsidies are wasteful but then say — just to stick to ideological, way-out-there principle that we can’t eliminate that subsidy in the debt-limit deal,” said Schumer, the chairman of the Senate Democratic Policy Committee, at a press conference in the Capitol.

Democrats are calling for several revenue measures in the deficit deal, including repeal of billions of dollars' worth of oil industry tax breaks.

“If you begin to look at ethanol and you begin to look at oil subsidies, you can see a way in which you begin to ultimately end the tax breaks that Americans shouldn’t bear any more and that we can put toward deficit reduction,” said Sen. Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezPoll: Menendez has 17-point lead over GOP challenger Russian attacks on America require bipartisan response from Congress Justice Dept intends to re-try Menendez in corruption case MORE (D-N.J.).

McConnell has rebuffed calls to address tax revenues in the deficit talks, preferring a singular focus on spending.

McConnell’s office, ahead of Wednesday’s Democratic press conference, circulated the minority leader’s mid-June comments about reforming tax subsidies, in which he said the issue should instead be addressed in a broader — and separate — tax-reform package.

“The difficulty of doing tax reform in the context of the Biden discussions is pretty obvious. It's a big, comprehensive subject,” McConnell said June 14, referring to talks between Vice President Biden and Capitol Hill lawmakers on the debt ceiling, which President Obama has since joined directly. McConnell said tax subsidies should be addressed in a broad tax-reform bill.

“You'd look at preferences and subsidies and rates and all of that together. I would be surprised, frankly, if we get into the tax issue in the ... Biden discussions leading to a vote on the debt ceiling,” McConnell said.

But Sen. John CornynJohn CornynSenate approves .3 trillion spending bill, sending to Trump GOP senator threatened to hold up bill over provision to honor late political rival: report Overnight Health Care: House passes .3T omnibus | Bill boosts funds for NIH, opioid treatment | Senators spar over ObamaCare fix | 'Right to Try' bill heads to the Senate MORE (R-Texas), who heads the Senate Republicans’ political campaign arm, told reporters Wednesday that he would be open to killing the ethanol subsidy in a debt-reduction plan. “I wouldn’t be opposed to that,” he said.

Cornyn, however, then highlighted the GOP push to win major spending cuts, and expressed doubt that tax revenues could be addressed in the deficit talks. “I just don’t know if there is enough time to do it in a responsible way,” he said.   

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Health Care: House passes .3T omnibus | Bill boosts funds for NIH, opioid treatment | Senators spar over ObamaCare fix | 'Right to Try' bill heads to the Senate Overnight Regulation: Omnibus includes deal on tip-pooling rule | Groups sue over rules for organic livestock | AT&T, DOJ make opening arguments in merger trial Warren presses Mulvaney, Azar on tip pooling MORE (R-Tenn.) has called for examining a range of "unwarranted" energy-related tax breaks, but has similarly expressed doubt about tackling the issue in the deficit talks.

But Schumer sought to emphasize that some Republicans have acknowledged the need to address revenues in a wider budget package, citing the bipartisan “Gang of Six” senators — which Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnPaul Ryan should realize that federal earmarks are the currency of cronyism Republicans in Congress shouldn't try to bring back earmarks Republicans should know reviving earmarks is a political nightmare MORE (R-Okla.) later abandoned — that explored a mix of spending cuts and tax revenues.

He cast McConnell’s position as fealty to Americans for Tax Reform President Grover Norquist, who argues that any reductions in tax credits or deductions should be matched with cutting tax rates.

“Leader McConnell has decided to walk out on the same limb as Grover Norquist, he is being adamant that we should figure out a way to achieve $4 trillion dollars in debt reduction without including any revenues at all,” Schumer said.

The Democrats’ use of the ethanol vote as a gambit in the deficit talks comes amid ongoing negotiations about a compromise on repealing the ethanol blenders’ credit.

Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTop Senate Dems demand report from Trump on UK nerve agent attack Feinstein, Harris call for probe of ICE after employee resigns Jeh Johnson: Media focused on 'Access Hollywood' tape instead of Russian meddling ahead of election MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharDems ask FTC to probe if other companies also obtained Facebook data Students bash Congress for inaction on gun control Overnight Cybersecurity: House Intel votes to release Russia report | House lawmakers demand Zuckerberg testify | Senators unveil updated election cyber bill MORE (D-Minn.) and John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenate GOP chairman calls on Zuckerberg to testify GOP pushes to change Senate rules for Trump With shutdown nearing, focus turns to Rand Paul MORE (R-S.D.) are in talks about a compromise plan that would quickly end the blenders’ credit — which is slated to expire at year’s end — and apply the savings to deficit reduction and other ethanol industry support.

Feinstein and Coburn have led the charge to simply kill the roughly $6 billion annual blenders’ tax credit, and the ethanol import tariff.

The Minnesota and South Dakota senators — who are allies of ethanol producers — oppose plans to kill subsidies without providing other industry assistance, such as extending separate tax credits for producing next-wave, cellulosic ethanol.

While Feinstein suggested Tuesday that a deal was at hand, she told reporters Wednesday that talks remain ongoing. “What I thought was going to be done isn’t done,” she said in the Capitol.

Thune, in the late morning Wednesday, said that all issues are not yet resolved. “The credit will go away ... but there is an issue that we still need to get settled on,” Thune said in the Capitol. He didn’t provide specifics.

Klobuchar also noted Wednesday that negotiations are ongoing.

“Every month [the ethanol blenders’ credit continues] is $400 million. You want to get it done as soon as possible so you can put more into the debt reduction, basically, and so that’s why there is an incentive for everyone to come together,” Klobuchar said.