Republican to Obama: Create jobs by ‘putting the brakes’ on EPA ‘train wreck’

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-Mich.) urged President Obama to reel in the Environmental Protection Agency after a new report showed job creation continues to lag.

“Millions of American jobs are in jeopardy because of the costly rules proposed or under development by the EPA, and that’s just one agency,” Upton said in a statement. “If this administration is serious about job creation and not just paying lip service, it should begin by putting the brakes on this regulatory train wreck.”

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Friday’s Bureau of Labor Statistics report showed the economy adding 117,000 jobs in July, a figure that exceeded expectations, but still fell short of the job-creation figures necessary to significantly reduce unemployment numbers.

Republicans quickly pounced on the report Friday. House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) said the report shows the administration needs to cut taxes and temper pending regulations.

Upton noted that Friday’s jobs report was “somewhat better than expected,” but he said the report highlights how far the economy needs to go to recover.

“Yet it underscores that America’s economy is limping under the weight of a large and growing federal government and the burdens and uncertainty created by reckless and relentless regulations,” Upton said. “After months of weak job creation and disappointingly slow GDP growth in the first half of this year, there is no doubt about the need to change course.”

Upton praised the debt agreement signed into law by Obama this week, but said, “the real work lies ahead.”

Reduced government spending should be paired with “regulatory relief,” Upton said, pointing to EPA regulations.

Republicans have cast the EPA as the symbol of government overreach, blasting the agency for regulations that they argue will impose massive burdens on the economy.

The GOP has pushed legislation and policy riders to block or limit a slew of EPA regulations, including the agency’s climate rules.

But the EPA says its rules impose only modest costs on industry and offer significant health benefits that will prevent thousands of premature deaths.