Senators look to reinstate defense biofuels spending


Sens. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofePence announces first steps in establishing 'Space Force' EPA chief: Obama car rule rollback would save consumers 0B EPA’s Wheeler gets warmer welcome at Senate hearing MORE (R-Okla.) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainRand Paul’s Russia visit displays advancement of peace through diplomacy GOP leader criticizes Republican senators for not showing up to work CNN poll: Kavanaugh has lowest public support of Supreme Court nominee since Bork MORE (R-Ariz.) got Democratic support in the Armed Services Committee to tack amendments onto the spending bill that handcuff the Navy’s ability to use biofuels. Republicans like Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Defense: Pompeo creates 'action group' for Iran policy | Trump escalates intel feud | Report pegs military parade cost at M Hillicon Valley: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey sits down with The Hill | Drama over naming DHS cyber office | Fallout over revoking Brennan's security clearance | Google workers protest censored search engine for China Trump escalates feud with intelligence officials MORE (R-Maine) have voiced support for biofuels on the grounds of energy independence.

Possible courses of actions in the Senate to reinstate biofuels include explicitly letting the Navy purchase and develop biofuels for ships and aircraft and voting to remove the McCain and Inhofe amendments.

The McCain and Inhofe provisions would block spending on fuels that cost more than traditional fuel and stop funding bio-refineries for boosting production of experimental fuels.

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinConservatives see Kethledge as 'Gorsuch 2.0' How House Republicans scrambled the Russia probe Congress dangerously wields its oversight power in Russia probe MORE said Tuesday he backed efforts to put the biofuels measures back into the bill on the Senate floor.

“I’m all for it,” Levin told reporters.

At issue is a biofuels testing program demonstrated by the “Great Green Fleet” aircraft carrier strike group. The Navy says it needs the program to find alternative fuels that it claims will promote energy security and safeguard it from oil price shocks.

But opponents believe biofuels cost too much, especially when the Defense Department is staring down sequestration, which threatens to cut its budget by $492 billion over 10 years.