Dems want Obama to appeal ruling that nixed emissions rule

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Rep. Edward MarkeyEd MarkeyThe Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Overnight Regulation: Senate moves to strike Obama-era internet privacy rules Overnight Tech: Senate votes to eliminate Obama internet privacy rules | FCC chief wants to stay out of 'political debate' on fake news | Wikileaks reveals new CIA docs MORE (D-Mass.), a senior member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, similarly urged the administration to “appeal this misguided decision by the courts so that Massachusetts and other states impacted by harmful emissions from old, polluting coal plants can clean up their air.”

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, in a 2-1 decision released Tuesday, sent EPA back to the drawing board on the rule to curb soot- and smog-forming pollution from more than two dozen states in the eastern half of the country.

Environmentalists say the rule provides vital public health protections, while critics call the measure too aggressive, alleging it will impose economic burdens.

Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulWe need congressional debate on Yemen Senate takes up NATO membership for Montenegro Overnight Defense: Civilian casualties raise questions about rules of engagement | Air Force nominee set for hearing | Senate takes up NATO membership for Montenegro MORE (R-Ky.), who sponsored an unsuccessful resolution to overturn the regulation, cheered the court decision.

“I will continue to use the resources at my disposal to fight against an out-of-control EPA overreach into the rights of states and the lives of citizens,” he said in a statement.

Sen. James InhofeJames InhofeRepeal of Obama drilling rule stalls in the Senate GOP senator: EPA 'brainwashing our kids' A guide to the committees: Senate MORE (R-Okla.), the top Republican on the Environment and Public Works Committee, also called the decision good news, and alleged EPA has an “extremist agenda.”

“I am pleased that the courts have reined in EPA on this illegal, flawed rule,” he said in a statement. “With [the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule], EPA moved too far too fast, setting unrealistic deadlines for states to meet its stringent requirements.”