Dems want Obama to appeal ruling that nixed emissions rule

Rep. Edward MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyOvernight Tech: Zuckerberg breaks silence on Cambridge Analytica controversy | Senate passes sex trafficking bill | EU pushes new tax on tech | YouTube toughens rules on gun videos Dem senator responds to Zuckerberg: 'You need to come' testify Zuckerberg breaks silence on Cambridge Analytica crisis MORE (D-Mass.), a senior member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, similarly urged the administration to “appeal this misguided decision by the courts so that Massachusetts and other states impacted by harmful emissions from old, polluting coal plants can clean up their air.”

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, in a 2-1 decision released Tuesday, sent EPA back to the drawing board on the rule to curb soot- and smog-forming pollution from more than two dozen states in the eastern half of the country.

Environmentalists say the rule provides vital public health protections, while critics call the measure too aggressive, alleging it will impose economic burdens.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHouse poised to vote on .3T spending bill Overnight Finance: Lawmakers race to finalize omnibus | What we know about funding bill | White House on board | Fed raises rates for first time under Powell Senate passes controversial online sex trafficking bill MORE (R-Ky.), who sponsored an unsuccessful resolution to overturn the regulation, cheered the court decision.

“I will continue to use the resources at my disposal to fight against an out-of-control EPA overreach into the rights of states and the lives of citizens,” he said in a statement.

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeHouse members urge Senate to confirm Trump's NASA nominee Senators to Trump: Keep pressure on North Korea while exploring talks Why did this administration back the Palestine Liberation Organization in terrorism case? MORE (R-Okla.), the top Republican on the Environment and Public Works Committee, also called the decision good news, and alleged EPA has an “extremist agenda.”

“I am pleased that the courts have reined in EPA on this illegal, flawed rule,” he said in a statement. “With [the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule], EPA moved too far too fast, setting unrealistic deadlines for states to meet its stringent requirements.”