Clinton wants 'concessions' before backing crude oil exports

Clinton wants 'concessions' before backing crude oil exports
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonO’Malley tells Dems not to fear Trump FBI informant gathered years of evidence on Russian push for US nuclear fuel deals, including Uranium One, memos show Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE says she would consider lifting the federal ban on crude oil exports, but only if there are “concessions from the oil and gas industry." 

“In the absence of a broader energy plan that does include concessions from the oil and gas industry, I don’t think that the ban should be lifted,” Clinton, the Democratic presidential front-runner, told reporters in New Hampshire on Friday.

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“I’m not against it under all circumstances but I have not yet seen any legislation introduced that would strike the right balance, in my perspective.”

Clinton’s campaign said earlier this week that she opposes a House Republican bill to lift the 1970s-era crude oil export ban. But the campaign didn’t say whether she is opposed to just the House bill or crude exports in general. 

“The bill, as I understand it, does not come anywhere near doing what I think has to be done to move towards the energy transition that is so important to our country,” the former secretary of State added Friday.

Only three Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee voted to approve the bill when the panel considered it this week. Others, though, have raised the possibility of coming to some sort of compromise on the issue. 

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), who is pushing the issue in the upper chamber, said this week that she would consider attaching renewable energy tax credits to the bill if it means winning Democratic support for the measure. Including the tax credits might risk Republican support for the package, however.

The White House said this week that it opposes the House bill, but House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) said he thinks Republicans can secure enough votes to overcome a presidential veto.