Senate votes to strike down Obama’s climate rules

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The Senate voted Tuesday to block a pair of regulations representing the central pillars of President Obama’s climate change initiative. 

The votes approving resolutions under the Congressional Review Act come less than two weeks before Obama and other world leaders meet in Paris to agree to a worldwide pact to fight global warming.

The votes are symbolic, since Obama would veto the resolutions and supporters do not have the two-thirds majority needed in both chambers to override the vetoes.

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Senators voted 52-46 to stop the carbon dioxide limits for existing power plants, which mandate a 32 percent cut in the power sector’s carbon emissions by 2030. The move to block the related carbon rule for newly built power plants passed by the same vote.

Together, the regulations are the biggest part of Obama’s pledge going into the talks to reduce the United States’ greenhouse gases 26 percent to 28 percent.

Obama pledged to veto the Senate’s measures. But Republicans said it is nonetheless important to take a stand against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“If the administration’s proposed Clean Power Plan moves forward, hardship will be felt all across the country. Fewer job opportunities, higher power bills, and less reliable electricity will result,” Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Moore CapitoOvernight Tech: TV box plan faces crucial vote | Trump transition team to meet tech groups | Growing scrutiny of Yahoo security Senate committee to consider miner pension bill GOP pressures Kerry on Russia's use of Iranian airbase MORE (R-W.Va.) — who sponsored the legislation on the existing plant rule out of concern for West Virginia’s coal-dependent economy — said on the Senate floor.

“Congress should pass this resolution and place this critical issue squarely on the president’s desk,” she said. “America’s economic future is at stake here, and it is time to send a clear signal that enough is enough.”

Sen. Heidi HeitkampHeidi HeitkampElection-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Democrats press Wells Fargo CEO for more answers on scandal Wells Fargo board to decide on executive clawbacks MORE (D-N.D.), who also sponsored Capito’s resolution, said the EPA’s rule threatens to harm electricity reliability so much that Americans could not be sure their lights would turn on.

“The one thing that we do is that when you reach over to turn on a light switch in the United States of America, the lights come on. And it doesn’t matter what time of the day,” she said, adding that the EPA rule would make that more difficult.

The White House said Obama would veto the measures, saying they would threaten billions of dollars of benefits to public health and the environment from the regulations.

“Most importantly, the resolution would impede efforts to reduce carbon pollution from existing power plants — the largest source of carbon pollution in the country — when the need to act, and to act quickly, to mitigate climate change impacts on American communities has never been more clear,” the White House said of the existing plant measure, with a similar statement on the other resolution.

Democrats largely agreed, and they criticized Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellMcConnell: Cures bill a 'top priority' in lame duck McConnell opens door to changing 9/11 bill Reid sums up 114th Congress as 'a flop' MORE (R-Ky.) for bringing it to the floor instead of more pressing matters, like funding homeland security.

“I find it really hard to comprehend that a majority of this senate led by my Republican friends would side with the special interests above the people who simply want to breathe clean air, who simply want to see us dedicated to the fight against climate change,” said Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerDems gain upper hand on budget Overnight Finance: Senate rejects funding bill as shutdown looms | Labor Dept. to probe Wells Fargo | Fed to ease stress test rules for small banks Funding bill rejected as shutdown nears MORE (D-Calif.), the ranking member of the Environment and Public Works Committee.

She asked why McConnell would bring up the resolutions after last week’s terrorist attacks in Paris “instead of taking up that budget agreement and looking in a bipartisan way at every single agency ... that we fund to make sure they are doing everything to keep America safe?”

“This is an historic debate,” Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyFCC pulls vote on contentious box plan in final minutes Overnight Cybersecurity: FBI probes possible hack of Dems' phones | Trump's '400-pound hacker' | Pressure builds on Yahoo | Poll trolls run wild Dems tie nuclear first-strike bill to concerns about Trump MORE (D-Mass.) said earlier Tuesday. “It basically boils down to whether or not in the 21st century the United States is going to be leader in the clean energy revolution … or we are still going to be tied to 19th-century technologies like coal.”

The rules, which were made final in August, are also under litigation after various states and dozens of energy companies and groups sued in federal court to stop it.

The House Energy and Commerce Committee is expected to vote Wednesday on that chamber’s versions of both resolutions.

Sens. Joe DonnellyJoe DonnellyOvernight Finance: Senate rejects funding bill as shutdown looms | Labor Dept. to probe Wells Fargo | Fed to ease stress test rules for small banks Overnight Energy: Judges scrutinize Obama climate rule Funding bill rejected as shutdown nears MORE (D-Ind.) and Joe ManchinJoe ManchinElection-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Mylan CEO should be ashamed of EpiPen prices Overnight Finance: Senate rejects funding bill as shutdown looms | Labor Dept. to probe Wells Fargo | Fed to ease stress test rules for small banks MORE (D-W.Va.) joined Heitkamp to buck their party and vote for the resolutions.

Send. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteAbortion rights group ads tie vulnerable GOP senators to Trump Election-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Vulnerable NH Republican ties reelection bid to Trump MORE (R-N.H.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsElection-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables Swing-state Republicans play up efforts for gun control laws Reid knocks GOP on gun 'terror loophole' after attacks MORE (R-Maine) and Mark KirkMark KirkFormer Miss Universe becomes surprise story to emerge from debate Senate rivals gear up for debates The Trail 2016: Trump seizes on Charlotte violence MORE (R-Ill.) voted with the Democrats against the measures.