Enviro group ups spending to unseat Mass. Sen. Brown

The mailer, along with a more than $700,000 canvassing initiative, will likely push the group’s spending on the race over the $1 million mark, Nayak said.

LCV’s political action arm has spent more than $5 million so far in this election cycle, already topping its 2010 total, Nayak said.

It has backed Democrats Warren, Rep. Martin HeinrichMartin HeinrichNew legislation tells fourth graders to take a hike Dems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity The Memo: Five takeaways from Jeff Sessions’s testimony MORE (N.M.), former Virginia Gov. Tim KaineTim KaineSenate Dems launch talkathon ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote 40 million fewer people expected to vote in 2018, study finds Al Gore warns Democrats about accusing Trump of treason MORE, Rep. Chris MurphyChris MurphyTough road ahead for McConnell on ObamaCare Dem senator: Trump's 'icky' Boy Scout speech left 'my stomach in knots' Senate Dems launch talkathon ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote MORE (Conn.) and Sen. Jon TesterJon TesterGOP Senator forces Dems to vote on single payer Vulnerable senators raise big money ahead of 2018 'Kate's Law' battle shifts to the Senate, testing Dems MORE (Mont.).

Last week, LCV opened up a six-figure campaign against Murphy’s Republican opponent, Linda McMahon. The group also spent $850,000 on a direct-mail effort in Virginia that aims to paint Kaine’s rival, former Sen. George Allen (R-Va.), as a pawn of Big Oil.

The group also has spent $1.5 million on House races attempting to unseat five GOP lawmakers it has dubbed the “Flat Earth Five.” That campaign targets Reps. Ann Marie Buerkle (N.Y.), Dan BenishekDan BenishekRepublican groups launch final ad blitz in key House battlegrounds Tea Party class reassesses record Michigan Republican to retire MORE (Mich.), Dan Lungren (Calif.), Quico Canseco (Texas) and Joe Walsh (Ill.).

Nayak said such endeavors would continue through the Nov. 6 election.

“Absolutely,” he said. “We continue to see really stark contrasts between the candidates on our issues in these elections.”

Nayak said he hopes the 150,000 people reached through the mailer will make it “very hard for them to even consider voting for Scott Brown.”

The mailer will emphasize Brown’s vote to sustain oil industry tax breaks, which Nayak said is out of step with most Massachusetts voters.

Nayak noted that a higher turnout is expected in a presidential election year compared with the special election Brown won to replace the late Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.). He said the mail campaign is necessary to familiarize more of the state’s voters with Brown’s positions and record.

The Hill rates the Massachusetts race as a “toss-up.”