Panel to try again on EPA nominee

Democrats will try to advance Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) nominee Gina McCarthyGina McCarthyTrump plans to roll back environmental rule everyone agrees on EPA chief to visit Colorado mine spill site In the fight between Rick Perry and climate scientists, Perry is winning MORE to the full Senate again next week after a GOP boycott thwarted attempts to do so Thursday.

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), who has been in ill health, will make the trip to the Capitol for the May 16 hearing, Caley Gray, a spokesman for Lautenberg, told The Hill. That would give the Senate Environment Public Works Committee a quorum for a vote.

The GOP’s absence and two missing Democrats — Sen. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBernie Sanders flexes power on single-payer ObamaCare architect supports single-payer system Trump has yet to travel west as president MORE (D-Mont.) also wasn’t present — left the committee two members shy of a quorum Thursday, thwarting a vote on McCarthy, EPA’s top air quality regulator.

Republicans are blocking McCarthy’s nomination because they want EPA to hand over more information about the data it uses to design regulations that the GOP and industry oppose. They say McCarthy has not fully answered inquiries about transparency at the agency.

Democrats contend McCarthy has answered more than 1,000 questions. They — along with President Obama — say Republicans are being “obstructionist.”

Committee Republicans might disagree that Democrats can proceed with a vote, citing committee rules.

Ranking member Sen. David VitterDavid VitterYou're fired! Why it's time to ditch the Fed's community banker seat Overnight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator MORE (R-La.) cited committee rules that two members of the minority party must be present for a vote in a Thursday memo to committee Chairwoman Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerTrump riles Dems with pick for powerful EPA job Pelosi's chief of staff stepping down Time is now to address infrastructure needs MORE (D-Calif.).

Staff members for committee Democrats maintain that Senate rules trump committee policy for such votes. Senate rules require one more lawmaker than half the total body — in this case, 10 lawmakers.

Even if the committee does advance McCarthy to the full Senate, confirming her could be difficult.

Republicans have floated the idea of employing a filibuster on her nomination, and it is unclear whether Democrats could escalate the 60-vote threshold.

Vitter’s office did not respond to requests for comment.

--This report was updated at 8:30 p.m.