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Top Senate Dem might conduct oversight of Keystone pipeline

Asked directly whether he has a hearing planned on the topic, Wyden said, “Let me have a chance to talk to senators about those issues before I make any proclamations.”

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The comments come after Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenSenate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA GOP anxious with Trump on trade GOP lawmakers to Trump: Don't fire Mueller MORE (R-N.D.) told reporters last week that he was talking to Wyden about a potential hearing on Keystone.

Hoeven said he was willing to shelve a planned amendment to energy-efficiency legislation that would force a vote on Keystone in exchange for a hearing. TransCanada Corp.’s project is awaiting a federal decision for a cross-border permit needed to complete the pipeline’s northern leg.

While Hoeven’s concession on the amendment front could help Wyden move that bill, it also might give the Oregon Democrat a chance to raise concerns he has about the pipeline.

Wyden has long said he believes the oil sands Keystone would haul to the Gulf Coast are destined for markets abroad, rather than for domestic consumption — a claim he reiterated Tuesday.

“You’ve got basically half of the refineries in the Gulf Coast area essentially foreign-controlled. And they’ve already indicated that they want to export. And a bunch of the American-owned refineries want to export. So I’ve been concerned for some time about the export question,” he said.

Keystone’s supporters, such as Hoeven, contend the export aspect is overblown. They say supplies from the pipeline would offset imports of Venezuelan oil, strengthening U.S. energy security in the process.

Wyden on Tuesday praised Hoeven's willingness to withhold tacking an amendment on Keystone to the energy-efficiency legislation sponsored by Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSenators call for probe into US Olympic Committee, USA Gymnastics after abuse scandal Trump officials take heat for declining Russia sanctions Schumer to Trump administration: Who met with Putin's spy chief? MORE (D-N.H.) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP leader: Congress may settle for pared-down immigration deal Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA Key senator floats new compromise for immigration talks MORE (R-Ohio).

Wyden has been working closely with the sponsors to limit controversial amendments to the bill, which sunk a similar version last year as Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTo end sugar subsidies, conservatives can't launch a frontal attack House presses Senate GOP on filibuster reform A pro-science approach to Yucca Mountain appropriations MORE (D-Nev.) proved reluctant to call it on the floor.

Wyden said Reid has been "very cooperative," but hasn't yet indicated when Shaheen-Portman might be considered in the Senate.