Hagan campaign says she opposes carbon tax

Sen. Kay HaganKay HaganPolitics is purple in North Carolina Democrats can win North Carolina just like Jimmy Carter did in 1976 North Carolina will be a big battleground state in 2020 MORE’s campaign said the North Carolina Democrat doesn’t support a carbon tax, despite a new advertising push that suggests she does.

“She opposes it (as evidenced by the act she voted against it),” Sadie Weiner, a spokeswoman for Hagan’s 2014 reelection effort, told The Hill in an email.

The statement comes after conservative energy group American Energy Alliance (AEA) began running radio ads across North Carolina slamming Hagan on the carbon tax issue.

In her response to The Hill, Weiner was referring to Hagan’s March vote against Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDems in Germany: Trump can't stop clean energy revolution Senate Dems demand answers on Social Security info given to election integrity commission Strange bedfellows on criminal justice reform could offer Trump a legislative win MORE’s (D-R.I.) amendment to the nonbinding Senate Democrat budget proposal.

That amendment, which failed 41-58, called for returning revenues from any fee on carbon pollution to the American public, such as through deficit reduction or lower tax rates.

The vote was largely symbolic, as the underlying bill was nonbinding. The Whitehouse amendment also didn’t exactly address the concept of carbon tax directly.

"Unlike the special interest outsiders trying to distort her record, Senator Hagan is standing up for North Carolina families and our state's jobs each and every day,” Weiner said, calling the AEA ad, “misleading.”

The AEA, however, is focusing on a vote Hagan cast on a different amendment to the Senate Democrat budget plan.

She voted against a measure from Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP senator: Capitol Hill's sexual harassment reporting protocol is 'totally inappropriate' Senate passes resolution requiring mandatory sexual harassment training Strange bedfellows on criminal justice reform could offer Trump a legislative win MORE (R-Mo.) that called for blocking a carbon tax. That amendment garnered 53 supporters, but needed 60 to pass.