Live coverage: March for Science rally is underway

Dems slam Trump on Earth Day

5:16 p.m.

A number of Democratic lawmakers took to Twitter on Saturday to slam President Trump's climate agenda and his administration's handling of scientific research.

The lawmakers used the March for Science demonstrations to go after the president's policies, with Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersModerates see vindication in Lipinski’s primary win Sanders: Fox News 'couldn't handle' town hall on economic inequality Mississippi woman appointed to Senate, making Vermont only state to never have female lawmaker MORE (I-Vt.) calling on Trump to "listen to the scientists who are out on the streets, not the fossil fuel industry and their lobbyists."

Demonstrations stretch to Antarctica 

4:05 p.m.

Researchers at the Neumayer-Station research center in Antarctica have tweeted their support for Saturday’s March for Science. 

The researchers tweeted a photo highlighting a quote by chemist Marie Curie. Their sign said “Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more so that we may fear less."

The German research station studies meteorology and atmospheric chemistry, among several other research areas. 

Demonstrators march toward the White House

2:55 p.m.

Those at the Washington, D.C., March for Science began marching across the National Mall toward the White House in the early afternoon. 

Bill Nye "The Science Guy" led a sizable group while helping hold a large banner spanning the length of several people.

Marchers carried a number of colorful signs on Saturday. One sign said, "We're so mad even the introverts are outside with people!" 

Trump: 'Rigorous science is critical'

1:40 p.m.

President Trump said Saturday that "rigorous science is critical" to his administration's efforts "to achieve the twin goals of economic growth and environmental protection."

"My Administration is committed to advancing scientific research that leads to a better understanding of our environment and of environmental risks," Trump said in a statement marking Earth Day.

"As we do so, we should remember that rigorous science depends not on ideology, but on a spirit of honest inquiry and robust debate," he said.

Trump remarked on the United States' "abundant natural resources and awe-inspiring beauty," saying there was "an obligation to safeguard them for future generations."

"My Administration is committed to keeping our air and water clean, to preserving our forests, lakes, and open spaces, and to protecting endangered species," he said. At the same time, Trump argued, "Economic growth enhances environmental protection."

"We can and must protect our environment without harming America’s working families. That is why my Administration is reducing unnecessary burdens on American workers and American companies, while being mindful that our actions must also protect the environment."

Nye criticizes lawmakers for 'ignoring' science

12:38 p.m.

Bill Nye "the science guy" is addressing the crowd in Washington, and slamming lawmakers who suppress science. 

"Without scientifically literate citizens, the United States, any country in fact cannot compete on the world stage," Nye said. "Yet today we have a great many lawmakers who are deliberately ignoring and actively suppressing science."

Penguins join march in "March of the Penguins for Science"

12:20 p.m.

Penguins from the Monterey Bay Aquarium joined in on the March for Science with a march of their own.


Nature Conservancy taking part in march

10:21 a.m.

The Nature Conservancy is taking part in Satuday's march, a departure for the non-partisan organization.

Bill Ulfelder said the group is marching because it is "fundamentally grounded in science" and that today is about marching for science. 

"Science is so fundamental to making our nation great," he told CNN in New York. "If that's not essential fiber, we have to stand up and support science."

Lawmakers join in on marches across the country

10:10 a.m.

Lawmakers expressed their support for the Science March on Saturday, with many even choosing to join in on marches across the country.

Marchers take to streets in London
9:14 a.m.
The March for Science isn't set to begin in Washington, D.C. until Saturday afternoon, but events are already taking place in London.
Here are some pictures from social media:
March set to begin in London
7:49 a.m.
The March for Science isn't just in Washington, D.C. — or in the United States.
Demonstrators are gathering in London for a march set to begin at 8 a.m.
Marches set to protest Trump climate policies
Activists, scientists and celebrities are gathering on the National Mall today for a rally supporting science in public policy, a protest designed to send a message to lawmakers — and President Trump. 
Organizers of the March for Science say the event is not meant to be a partisan affair. But Trump's agenda — with his proposed budget cuts to federal research and actions aimed at undoing American climate change work — is certain to take a beating from speakers and attendees at Saturday's rally. 
The Washington march is one of hundreds of similar marches taking place around the country today. The event is modeled after the Women's March, a protest that attracted millions of marchers in cities around the world the day after Trump took office.
Events are also taking place in other countries, including in London, where a march is expected to begin at 8 a.m. EST.