E2 Round-up: Enviros race to define Brown’s climate-changing win

She points to signs such as Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDems want Sessions to recuse himself from Trump-Russia probe Ryan says Trump, GOP 'in complete sync' on ObamaCare Congress has a mandate to repeal ObamaCare MORE’s (D-Nev.) recent pledge to bring up a climate bill this year and the work of Sens. John KerryJohn KerryOvernight Defense: Obama defends Manning commutation after backlash | Mattis clears Senate panel Kerry: Trump can’t instantly undo Obama actions ‘All or nothing’ leaves us nothing MORE (D-Mass.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamTrump’s UN pick threads needle on Russia, NATO Haley slams United Nations, echoing Trump Haley to question US funding of UN: report MORE (R-S.C.) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) to craft a bipartisan plan.

Taylor-Miesle also writes that she’s “not counting Brown out.”

“Most of Brown's tea party supporters are out-of-staters, eager to push their agenda in whatever campaign they can. But now that the election is over, those folks will return home, and Brown will be left with the people who elected him -- Massachusetts citizens who have said in poll after poll that they want clean energy and climate legislation to pass,” she writes.

Over at the Dallas Morning News, however, Washington reporter Dave Michaels wonders whether climate change legislation is "still a priority for team Obama.”

His piece came before Brown’s win last night, but he notes that White House senior advisor David Axelrod didn’t list climate among the top 2010 priorities in a briefing with reporters Tuesday.

The future of the U.S. coal industry is bound up in whatever climate change decisions lawakers do -- or don't -- make.

But even with national legislation in limbo, a new report by West Virginia environmental consultants predicts continued declines in Central Appalachian coal production and urges states in the region to boost their support for renewable energy development, the Associated Press reports.