Lieberman: ‘detailed narrative’ of climate bill en route

The three senators are planning a climate and energy measure that scraps the “economy-wide” cap-and-trade plan that the House approved last year, but has not gained traction in the Senate.

It remains unclear if their approach – which might include a cap-and-trade program for power plants and a carbon tax or fee on motor fuels – can fare any better and win a spot on the election-year floor agenda.

They met today with a group of colleagues including: Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax BaucusChanging of the guard at DC’s top lobby firm GOP hasn’t reached out to centrist Dem senators Five reasons why Tillerson is likely to get through MORE (D-Mont.), Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.), Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowUSDA to ease school meal standards Medicare’s coverage decisions need more input from physicians Members help package meals at Kraft Heinz charity event in DC MORE (D-Mich.), Carl LevinCarl LevinFor the sake of American taxpayers, companies must pay their fair share What the Iran-Contra investigation can teach us about Russia probe Senate about to enter 'nuclear option' death spiral MORE (D-Mich.), Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Five unanswered questions after Trump's upset victory Pavlich: O’Keefe a true journalist MORE (D-La.), Tom CarperTom CarperDems blast Trump's policies at Climate March What to know about Trump's national monuments executive order Dems probe claims of religious bias in DHS 'trusted traveler' program MORE (D-Del.), Mark WarnerMark WarnerHollywood, DC come together for First Amendment-themed VIP party IT modernization bill reintroduced in Congress Want to grow the economy? Make student loan repayment assistance tax-free. MORE (D-Va.), Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownTrump talks big on trade, but workers need action Dems crowd primaries to challenge GOP reps Battle begins over Wall Street rules MORE (D-Ohio) and George Voinovich (R-Ohio). 

“We made a lot of progress I thought,” Kerry said after exiting the meeting. He also noted that he has been meeting with other Republicans.

Lawmakers emerging from the meeting – one of several that Kerry, Graham and Lieberman are holding with various colleagues –  called the session a broad discussion rather than talks about specifics or details.

“There were some interesting things that were discussed in there and like everything else in the United States Senate, the devil is in the details,” Voinovich said, noting he wanted to hear more about the plans. “There is more meat that has got to be put on the bones.”

“They are very anxious to work with us to make sure that what is in there is good for manufacturing,” noted Stabenow, while Baucus called the new effort “refreshing” and said it shows “new thinking.”

Less clear still is when the plan will morph into actual legislation. Kerry, asked if he envisioned introducing a bill by Easter (which is in early April), replied “that would be nice.”