Climate sales pitch continues in Senate, via PowerPoint

* The meeting included liberal and moderate Democrats from all over the country. Sen. George Voinovich (R-Ohio) was the only Republican other than Graham (who arrived late).

Here is a list of the Dems: Majority Whip Richard DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinAmerica’s waning commitment to the promise of the First Amendment Senate rejects Trump immigration plan What to watch for in the Senate immigration votes MORE (Ill.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseCommittee chairman aims for House vote on opioid bills by Memorial Day Regulators seek to remove barriers to electric grid storage Prison sentencing bill advances over Sessions objections MORE (R.I.), Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownLawmaker interest in NAFTA intensifies amid Trump moves Dem senator shares photo praising LeBron James after Laura Ingraham attacks Trump gets recommendation for steep curbs on imported steel, risking trade war MORE (Ohio), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Mueller indictment reveals sophisticated Russian manipulation effort GOP cautious, Dems strident in reaction to new indictments MORE (Va.), Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerKamala Harris endorses Gavin Newsom for California governor Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response Billionaire Steyer to push for Dem House push MORE (Calif.), Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann Stabenow10 Senate Democrats are up for reelection in Trump country At least Alzheimer’s research is bringing Washington together Senate Dems block crackdown on sanctuary cities MORE (Mich.), Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperTrump states would bear brunt of gas tax increase: conservative groups Trump talk riles advocates on both sides of gas tax Senate bill would let EPA implement global greenhouse gas deal MORE (Del.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuProject Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' MORE (La.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOvernight Defense: VA chief won't resign | Dem wants probe into VA hacking claim | Trump official denies plan for 'bloody nose' N. Korea strike | General '100 percent' confident in US missile defense Trump official denies US planning 'bloody nose' strike on North Korea House Oversight Committee opens probe into sexual abuse of gymnasts MORE (N.H.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinLawmakers feel pressure on guns Feinstein: Trump must urge GOP to pass bump stock ban Florida lawmakers reject motion to consider bill that would ban assault rifles MORE (Calif.), Frank Lautenberg (N.J.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand Dems seek reversal of nursing home regulatory rollback MORE (Minn.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyGrassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees 2020 Dem contenders travel to key primary states Mulvaney remarks on Trump budget plan spark confusion MORE (Ore.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonGingrich says arming teachers only long-term solution to school shootings Florida students turn to activism in wake of shooting CNN invites Trump to town hall with parents, students of Florida high school MORE (Fla.), Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn Murray30 million people will experience eating disorders — the CDC needs to help Mulvaney remarks on Trump budget plan spark confusion Overnight Finance: Mulvaney sparks confusion with budget remarks | Trump spars with lawmakers on tariffs | Treasury looks to kill 300 tax regs | Intel chief's warning on debt MORE (Wash.), Mark UdallMark Emery UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (Colo.) and Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinWashington puts Ethiopia's human rights abusers on notice Overnight Defense: Mattis vows Dreamers in military won't be deported | Pentagon unsure if military parade will be in Washington | Dem bill would block funds for parade Dems introduce bills to block funds for Trump's proposed parade MORE (Md.).

* Lieberman told reporters afterward that the trio wants feedback from their colleagues on the plan, but soon, because they hope to complete a draft bill during the two-week Spring recess that is slated to begin March 29. Kerry noted that “we have some really key meetings in the next few days . . . we have a lot of work to do in the next 48 hours.”

* Lieberman said several low-carbon energy industries have the Senate trio’s back in opposing an “energy only” bill that omits limits on greenhouse gas emissions. (There’s more here on the “energy only” idea that several centrist Democrats are pushing.)

He cited the nuclear, renewable energy, natural gas vehicle, and electric car sectors, “all of whom say you can’t just do a traditional energy bill, you’ve got to price carbon.”

“That’s what is going to drive this change toward energy independence and carbon pollution reduction,” he added.

* One more thing from Lieberman: He rather humorously noted the tough slog an energy and climate bill faces. Asked about reconciling the nascent Senate bill with the sweeping climate and energy bill the House approved last year, he replied: “I have fantasies of reaching that point.”

* The offshore drilling expansion in the Senate plan will gives states discretion about what oil-and-gas leasing could occur in federal waters off their shores, some senators said, although details remain scarce. (Apparently it also dangles a cut of the leasing and royalty revenue before states as a carrot.)

Boxer said the plan includes “giving states the right to object.”

“They give a lot of power to the states on that,” she told reporters after leaving the meeting.

This isn’t a new idea -- various proposals that would allow states to “opt-in” to coastal drilling have been around for years. In 2008, the House approved -- during the feverish election-year fight over record energy prices -- a Democratic bill that relaxed leasing bans in place at the time.

That plan would have allowed drilling greater than 100 miles off state coasts, and within 50-100 miles if state governments agreed to it, while retaining bans on drilling that cover much of the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

A far more aggressive House GOP version that included the state revenue-sharing carrot passed the House in 2006. That plan would have similarly lifted bans greater than 100 miles from shore, while also allowing drilling within 50-100 miles unless state government’s formally opposed it, while states could “opt-in” to leasing closer than 50 miles from shore.

Neither passed the Senate, but Democrats under pressure over energy costs reluctantly allowed coastal leasing bans (which had covered most areas outside the Gulf of Mexico and Alaska) to expire in October of 2008. The Interior Department, under President Obama, hasn’t yet said where it may allow expanded offshore oil-and-gas leasing now that th formal bans are gone. But the White House is open to wider leasing as part of a broader energy package.