Inhofe sees only 26 votes for climate bill

Sen. James InhofeJames InhofeMcCain strikes back as Trump’s chief critic Turbulence for Trump on air traffic control Parliamentarian threatens deadly blow to GOP healthcare bill MORE (R-Okla.), the Senate’s leading climate skeptic, said Thursday that upcoming climate change legislation has so little political traction that it would only garner 26 Senate votes.

“I know we can beat it,” Inhofe said on the Fox Business Network, later adding, “I can assure you, I don't think they have more than 25 votes on the Democrats' side, and if you throw Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamThe Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Judiciary Committee to continue Russia probe after Mueller meeting Why does Paul Ryan want to punish American consumers? MORE [R] in there, that would be 26 votes.”

South Carolina’s Graham — along with Sens. John KerryJohn KerryBudowsky: Dems madder than hell Tillerson: 'My view didn’t change' on Paris climate agreement CORRECTED: Three members of Mueller's team have donated to Democrats MORE (D-Mass.) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) — intend to roll out broad climate and energy legislation on April 26.



Supporters of the bill are no doubt confident they can corral far more support if the measure reaches the floor. The last time a climate change bill came up was June of 2008, when legislation crafted by Lieberman, Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerTime is now to address infrastructure needs Tom Steyer testing waters for Calif. gubernatorial bid Another day, another dollar for retirement advice rip-offs MORE (D-Calif.) and then-Sen. John Warner (R-Va.) died on a 48-36 cloture vote.

At the time, sponsors claimed they had actually demonstrated support of 54 senators, citing statements from six senators who said they would have voted to advance the measure if they had been present (although 10 Democrats, including nine who had voted for cloture, said they would not have supported final passage of the bill unless changes were made).

This time around, Kerry, Graham and Lieberman hope they can get over the 60-vote hurdle by including several sweeteners for centrist Democrats and Republicans, such as wider federal support for nuclear power and offshore oil-and-gas drilling provisions.